Alphabet Block Pincushion

I’ve been wanting to make a new pincushion for a few years now.  I know, a basic pincushion is about as simple as it gets, so what was the hold up?  I wanted something different.  Something I hadn’t already seen out there with pins sticking out of it.  I starting thinking about what kinds of shapes would lend themselves to pin stickery, and I’m not sure how I got from there to here, but I’m happy with the results.  Do you want to know how to make one?

Alphabet Block Pincushion by Crafty Staci

You’ll need:

  • 2” square block of foam
  • 6 pieces of wood print fabric cut 2 1/2” square
  • 6 pieces of fusible fleece cut 2 1/4” square
  • 4 pieces of stitch witchery or Wonder Under cut 2 1/2” square
  • 4 pieces of felt 2 1/2” square
  • Craft thread
  • These letters and numbers (the font is Cooper Black)

I tried this first with regular stuffing and ended up with less of a block than a ball, so I switched to foam.  Some foam is springier than others, so you might want to try a pin-stab test before you choose one.

Lightly trace a number onto the front of one fabric square.  Iron a square of fleece onto the back.  Stitch the number on with craft thread, using the embroidery stitch of your choice.  I used a simple back stitch.

Trace the frame and reversed letters onto the paper side of the stitch witchery.  This flat light table my husband gave me for Christmas is AMAZING.  It’s not even a quarter of an inch thick.

Tracing letters on light table - Crafty Staci

Iron the letters onto the felt squares. 

Letters ironed onto felt - Crafty Staci

Cut out the letters and the inside of the frames.  I found it was easier if I cut the inside of the frames first, then the inside of the letters (like the D), then the outside of the letters.

Cut out felt letters - Crafty Staci

Peel off the paper and iron the frames and letters onto four of the remaining fabric squares.

Felt letters ironed onto fabric - Crafty Staci

Add some decorative stitches to the letters to hold them to the fabric.

Number and letters stitched - Crafty Staci

Iron the fusible fleece onto all five remaining fabric pieces (the four with letters and one blank).

Attach fusible fleece - Crafty Staci

Pin the number and one of the letters with right sides together and the tops of the characters pointing the same direction.  Stitch together with a 1/4” seam, beginning and stopping 1/4” from each end.

First seam - Crafty Staci

Do the same with the opposite letter, but with the bottom of the number and top of the letter pointing the same way.  Be sure to continue leaving 1/4” open at both ends of each seam.

Second seam - Crafty Staci

Add the two side letters with the tops of the letters closest to the number.  Add the blank square to the bottom of one of the letters.

All sides sewn on - Crafty Staci

Stitching one seam at a time, pull the sides of two letters together, with right sides facing each other.  Begin the seam where the two previous seams meet at the top (which should be 1/4” from the corner) and end it 1/4” from the bottom. Repeat for all four sides and the top.

Side and top seams sewn - Crafty Staci

Fold the edge of the open flap under 1/4” and press.  Do the same with its matching side on the cube.  This will make it easier at the end when you’ll be hand stitching that seam closed.

Fold edges under - Crafty Staci

Stitch the two sides as you did all the others.

Sewing side seams - Crafty Staci

Carefully clip the corners to reduce bulk.  Turn the cube right side out through the opening.  Push out the corners with something pointy.

Cube turned right side out - Crafty Staci

Compress the foam cube and push it into the opening.  Use your fingers and/or your pointy tool to align the corners and straighten the sides. 

Adding foam cube - Crafty Staci

Pull the two folded edges together and hand stitch closed.

Hand stitching final seam - Crafty Staci

Just add pins, and you’re finished.

Alphabet Block Pincushion from Crafty Staci

I made one of these that has already found its place next to my sewing machine.  The other one is part of the DIY Set I’m giving away on March 9th to one lucky reader.  If you haven’t had a chance to enter, be sure to head over and do it before midnight on March 8th!

Alphabet Block Pincushion - Crafty Staci

Quilt-As-You-Go Table Runner

Spending most of my days sewing, I tend to have a lot of fabric scraps.  I have a box of them that will eventually be cut into 2” squares and made into some sort of amazing quilt.  If they’d just take care of that square thing on their own it would go a lot faster, but they seem to be waiting for me.  This batch of scraps didn’t make it into the box though, and instead became this springy table runner.

Quilt-As-You-Go Table Runner by Crafty Staci

You have until March 8th to enter to win this, along with the Mug Hot Pads I showed you last week, my Craft Warehouse Design Team apron, some great cookbooks from Tuttle Publishing and a grocery list/menu pad I’ll be sharing here soon.  If you haven’t entered, get over there!  You can also still enter to win the gift certificate from Uncommon Goods.

In the meantime, I’m going to show you how to make this easy table runner.  It’s a great way to use up small pieces of fabric, and they don’t even need to be uniform in size.  In face, I think it’s better if they aren’t. 

To make this, you’ll need to cut a piece of cotton fabric for your backing in the approximate size you’d like your runner.  You may find it shrinks a bit as you sew it together.  You’ll also need a piece of thin batting in the same size.  I went with 12 by 30”.  Cut strips for the front that are slightly longer than the back (14”) and in varying widths.  You’ll need to account for seam allowances, so you’ll probably need more strips than you think. 

Pieces to cut for Quilt-As-You-Go Table Runner - Crafty Staci

Lay the backing face down.  Add the batting on top, then pin the two layers together with safety pins.  And pin some more.

Pinning first two layers - Crafty Staci

You don’t want those two layers shifting while you complete the remaining steps.  Another option would be to use fusible fleece, and just iron it onto your backing.

Lay one fabric strip, right side up, in the center of the runner.  Add a second strip on top, right side down, lining up the raw edges on the right.  Pin in place and stitch down the right side with a 1/4” seam.

Sewing down first strips - Crafty Staci

Fold out strip on right and press the seam.

Press first seam - Crafty Staci

Add another strip, face down, even with the edge of the first strip.  Do the same with the second strip.

Adding third and fourth strips - Crafty Staci

Stitch both sides with a 1/4” seam.  Flip them out and press, just like the first two strips.  Continue, adding one strip to each side and removing the safety pins as needed.

Several strips added - Crafty Staci

Stop when the batting is completely covered.  Trim the edges so they are even with the backing and batting.

Trim front to match back - Crafty Staci

To finish the edge, I cut binding strips from one of the fabrics.  Because of the direction I had to cut them, based on the fabric I had available, if I stitched them into one long strip the diagonal lines were going to go in two different directions.  Instead, I bound one edge at a time, starting with the long edges and folding the ends of the binding in 1/4”.

Binding the long edges - Crafty Staci

After those sides were finished I added binding on the short edges so the lines would all run in the same direction.

Binding the short edges - Crafty Staci

That’s it.  No additional quilting is necessary, because all the layers are bound together between each strip, as you can see on the also-usable back.

Quilt-As-You-Go Table Runner back - Crafty Staci

I have to admit, I really loved how this little runner brightened up the table, and it’s going to be tough to give it up.  That’s how much I appreciate you guys!

Quilt-As-You-Go Table Runner from Crafty Staci

Friday Favorites–Crafty Staci’s Top Twenty, Part 2

Since I began writing in 2010, I’ve shared 188 of my own tutorials here.  Wait, let me say that again –

188!!!

They account for about a quarter of my posts.  It felt like a shame to only talk about a few of those, so I settled on the top twenty for my anniversary Friday Favorites this year.  Last week I covered 20 – 11, so this week we’re down to the top ten.

10

More Fabric Flowers

This flower came about because I needed one that could be washed without fraying.  And it seemed like I was putting flowers on EVERYTHING for a while there.

10 More Fabric Flowers

9

Passport Wallet

This wallet happened when I was invited to participate in Pocket Week at Always Expect Moore.  It’s seen some action since then, and I’m hoping to take it to new places in the future.

9 Passport Wallet

8

Make Your Own Tags

I went through several methods of making my own tags before I landed on the one I use now.  Besides business purposes, I think they’re a nice way for a gift recipient to remember who a handmade item came from.

8 Make Your Own Tags

7

Ribbon Candy Ornaments

I have an entire box of these in my Christmas decorations.  I had to stop making them because I ran out of space to put them.  I might have to start slipping them into mailboxes or something.

7 Ribbon Candy Ornaments

6

Felt and Wire Angel

I almost didn’t even bother posting this little angel because I thought it was too simple for anyone to care about.  Lesson learned.

6 Felt and Wire Angel

5

Ninja Monkey Bag

This was one of the first projects where I stepped back when I was done and thought “I just designed a pattern!”

5 Ninja Monkey Bag

4

Fabric Daffodils

I still love these daffodils, but it will forever drive me crazy that I left off one petal.

4 Fabric Daffodils

3

Creamer Bottle Snowman

This chilly guy was the one that made me ask myself if I could share this stuff with others.  I guess you could call him my original muse.

3 Creamer Bottle Snowman

2

Robin Hood Hats

I don’t get to make a lot of things for my son, and he’s not easily impressed, so this hat will forever hold a place in my heart.  I also love how people around the world have adapted it for so many different characters.

2 Robin Hood Hats

1

Reversible Coffee Cup Sleeves

This one is in the number 1 slot by a landslide.  Always.  I’ve made hundreds of these.  No kidding.  Besides selling them on Etsy, everyone I know ends up with one at some point, and I actually have a storage area in my closet just to hold my own collection.

01 Reversible Coffee Cup Sleeves

Don’t forget to come back on Monday to enter my second Crafty Staci Anniversary Giveaway, sponsored by Tuttle Publishing and Craft Warehouse!

Hot Pad of the Month–February Mug

I love a good series.  There’s something about a set of anything that coordinates that gets my attention.  The Coffee Sleeve of the Month series I finished up last spring was so much fun for me.  It’s generally a healthy obsession…generally.  If, for instance, a fabric pattern comes in twelve colors and I own eleven of them I will never sleep again.  Rather than dwell on my personality disorders, lets talk about the new series I’m starting today!

February Hot Pad of the Month - Mug - Crafty Staci

This idea started, like many of mine do, with a page full of scribbling.  I wanted to make a mug-shaped hot pad, but soon my page was filled with other hot pads using the same shape as the cup, but with entirely different themes.  Then I wrote months next to the seasonal shapes, and pretty soon I had a calendar full – and then some.  I can’t wait to show you all of them, but for now, let’s talk about how to make that mug.

You’ll need this pattern, pieced together using the dotted line to match up the two sides.  You could cut the handle from one side before taping them together so you don’t have to trace it into another piece of paper.  Cut two of the mug and handle from cotton fabric, one of each from Insul-Bright and one of just the mug from cotton or cotton blend batting.  If you’d like the accent strip you’ll need to cut a cotton fabric strip 2” by 8 1/2”.

Mug Hot Pad pieces - Crafty Staci

Fold the long edges of the accent strip under 1/4” on each side and press.  Pin it in place on the front of the mug, 2” from the top edge.  Stitch along both edges.

Attaching accent strip - Crafty Staci

To assemble the handle, layer the pieces with the Insul-Bright first, with the two fabric pieces on top, right sides together.  Stitch around the outer and inner curves, 1/4” from the edge.  Leave the two short edges open.

Sewing the handle - Crafty Staci

Clip the curves.  Pin a safety pin to the seam.  Push the pin into the handle.

Turning handle - Crafty Staci

Lead the pin all the way through and out the other side to turn right side out.

Turned handle - Crafty Staci

Press the seams.  Top stitch close to the seams on both sides.

Finished handle - Crafty Staci

To prepare the mug for stitching, lay the Insul-Bright out with the shinier side up.  Lay the front mug, right side up, over that.  Add the handle, with the loop to the inside and the top 1 1/2” from the top of the mug.

Layering pieces - Crafty Staci

Lay the back, face down, over the top.  Add the batting, and carefully pin all the layers in place.  Stitch around the outside edge, leaving a 3” opening at the bottom.

Stitching outside edge - Crafty Staci

Clip the corners and turn right side out.  Press, turning in the opening.  Stitch close to the edge all the way around the mug.

Top stitching outside edge - Crafty Staci

You’ll want to add a bit of quilting to keep the layers from shifting.  I went with lines coming from the top and converging at the bottom center of the mug.  Knowing I couldn’t be consistent without some guidelines, I drew the lines on with a pen that can be erased with a bit of water.

Drawing guidelines for quilting - Crafty Staci

It was just a matter of stitching along those lines.  You could go with straight lines if you’re more comfortable with that.

Quilting lines - Crafty Staci

These are really easy, and would make a fantastic housewarming gift!

Mug Hot Pads - Crafty Staci

Are you ready for eleven other variations of this cute hot pad?

Mug Hot Pad - Crafty Staci

Remember when I told you there will be three giveaways for my 5th anniversary?  These two hot pads will be part of the Kitchen Set Giveaway that begins next Monday, so be sure to come back to enter.  You can still enter the giveaway that started this week for a $50 gift certificate to Uncommon Goods!

Friday Favorites–Crafty Staci’s Top Twenty, Part 1

About this time every year, I share with you the most popular tutorials from my blog.  I usually confine it to the top ten, but because this is a special, milestone year, I decided to expand it to the top twenty.  That gives a few things a chance to have their moment that don’t ordinarily make it onto the all-time list.  I’m here to try to make the popularity contest a little more inclusive.  Coming next to a high school near you.

20

 

Messenger Bag

I made this bag for my daughter when she bought her first laptop computer.  In an instance of blog vs. real life, I wanted to make it with pretty fabric, but it wouldn’t have suited my Batman-loving girl.

20 Messenger Bag

19

Lined Christmas Stockings

My daughter used this pattern to make a stocking for her new husband last Christmas.  <3

19 Lined Christmas Stockings

18

Glass Block To-Do List

The fact that this one made the list was a bit of a surprise to me, but I guess I really like it too, since it’s still in my kitchen after 4 years.

18 Glass Block To-Do List

17

Pencil and Paper Drink Sleeve and Mat

Since I started selling these in my Etsy shop with the teacher’s name hand embroidered on them, I can tell you exactly what you’ll find me working on every evening before Christmas and near the end of the school year.

17 Pencil and Paper Drink Sleeve and Mat

16

Drawstring Wristlet

I’m going to be perfectly honest here – when I started this wristlet, I didn’t think it was going to turn out well.  I took photos anyway, just in case, but I was winging it and I was intimidated by the fabric.  I’ve never been happier to be wrong.

16 Drawstring Wristlet

15

T-Shirt Bracelet

This bracelet was born out of a legitimate fail.  I tried to make a t-shirt into a summer top and it was wrong in every direction.  Fortunately, I was able to use it in this much more successful project.

15 T-Shirt Bracelet

14

Cross-Body Backpack

I made this backpack to carry my stuff on some land excursions during a family cruise to Mexico a few years ago.  This bag and I drove a dune buggy, rode a horse, toured a tequila distillery and hung out at the beach.  I still have it, and I think it deserves another trip.  You know, for the backpack’s sake.

14 Cross Body Backpack

13

Bleach-Sprayed T-Shirts

These were really fun to make, and now that I have a vinyl cutting machine they’d be even better.  It might be time to make these again.

13 Bleach-Sprayed T-Shirts

12

Knitting Loom Infinity Scarf

I have to assume this made the list because there are lots of other people out there trying to figure out how to make an infinity scarf on a knitting loom.  They’re probably a little disappointed by what they find here.  That, or everyone is enjoying laughing at my mistake.  I kinda hope it’s that second one.

12 Knitting Loom Infinity Scarf

11

Stethoscope Cover

This is one of the most controversial projects I’ve shared.  All I have to say about it is that these are allowed in some facilities and not others, so be sure to check before making one for yourself or giving it as a gift.  Goodness.

11 Stethoscope Cover

Look for the top ten next Friday!

Be sure to come back on Monday to enter my first Crafty Staci Anniversary Giveaway, courtesy of Uncommon Goods!

Fleece Ice Scraper Mitt

We have had a serious lack of winter weather this year.  My husband and I were at the beach last week, and it was mostly sunny and in the mid to high 50s.  What?  I shouldn’t be complaining, but this is January in Oregon and it just isn’t right.  I don’t really like to be cold, but I do like to look at it through the windows of my nice, warm house.  I probably won’t even get to use my toasty new ice scrapper mitt this year.

Fleece Ice Scraper Mitt by Crafty Staci

Enough of my whining.  I’m sure there are many of you out there who can use one of these this year and they’re easy to make, so let’s get started.  You’ll need some fleece, an ice scraper (I bought mine at the dollar store), this pattern and some heavy craft floss.

Ice Scraper Mitt supplies - Crafty Staci

Cut two on the fold, as indicated on the top of the pattern.

Pattern pieces for ice scraper mitt - Crafty Staci

Fold each piece with the right sides together and stitch 1/4” from the bottom edge.

Bottom seam on ice scraper mitt - Crafty Staci

Turn right side out and roll the seam between your fingers to flatten it out.  Top stitch 1/4” from the seam.

Topstitching on ice scraper mitt - Crafty Staci

Pin the two pieces together with the outsides facing each other – in my case that’s Woody and Buzz.  Make sure you use lots of pins to keep all four layers together.  My stitching didn’t catch one layer on my first try, and removing stitches from fleece is no fun at all.  Stitch down both sides, leaving the top folds and the bottom seam open.

Side seams stitched on ice scraper mitt - Crafty Staci

Turn right side out.  Clip the seam at each bottom corner so it pokes out less. 

Ice scraper mitt turned right side out - Crafty Staci

Insert the handle of your ice scraper into the hole at the top.  You can use it this way, if you don’t mind having to put it together every time you want to use it. 

Ice scraper mitt - Crafty Staci

I wanted the mitt and scraper attached to each other.  Mark the spot on the scraper where it’s inserted into the mitt as far as it will go.  The shape of your scraper will be a factor in where your holes will have to go.  Try to find flat spots that are about 1/4 – 1/2” from the top edge of the mitt.  Drill holes.

Drilling holes for ice scraper mitt - Crafty Staci

Insert the scraper back into the mitt and sew through the holes using heavy craft floss, catching both sides of the mitt each time.  A large needle is helpful here.

Stitching scraper to mitt - Crafty Staci

Knot the thread under the fleece.  The nice thing about these large stitches is that if the plastic scraper happens to break, you can just clip them and install a new one.

Stitches attaching mitt and scraper - Crafty Staci

Now you can just reach inside, grab the handle and rid your window of all that ice while your hand stays warm and dry.

Ice scraper handle inside mitt - Crafty Staci

If you’re concerned at about this fitting large hands, I had my son try it on and he has some GIANT paws.  He had no trouble getting it on, and his hand fit completely inside.

Ice Scraper Mitt fits guy hands too - Crafty Staci

Bring on the cold!

Puffy Fabric Flowers

It probably goes without saying, but you know I’m going to say it anyway.  Weddings generally involve a lot of flowers.  Especially outdoor summer weddings.  We had flowers EVERYWHERE.  Real, fabric, burlap, whatever we could turn into a flower-ish shape, we did.  One of my favorites was the cute puffy fabric version we used on the sign I showed you last week.  Fortunately, with a few basic materials, they’re also a breeze to make.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 1

All you need is this pattern, some fabric, a little polyester stuffing and a big button.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 2

Cut out ten petals for each flower you intend to make.  Pin two petals with right sides of the fabric together.  Stitch around the curved edge, 1/4” from the raw edge, leaving the straight edge open.  Repeat for the other four petals.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the petals right side out and press.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 4

Add a small amount of stuffing to the inside of each petal.  You don’t want them stuffed tightly, just enough to give them a little fluff.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 5

Pinch a petal so the seams are touching each other at the bottom.  Using a needle and knotted thread, stitch through both seams. 

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 6

Without knotting or cutting the thread, do the same with the next petal.  Repeat until all five petals are on the thread. 

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 7

Stitch back through the first petal again, creating a loop.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 8

Pull the thread tightly to gather all the petals together.  Knot the thread, but don’t cut it.  Flatten all the raw edges together in the center and stitch through the center a few times to hold them in place.  You really just want to make sure they’ll be under your button.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 9

I really like the look of the split petal version.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 10

Stitch the button to the center.  You could also glue it, but I found stitching it through all the layers added to the dimension of the flower.

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 11

Now you can sew or glue these to whatever needs a little puffy flower perk-up!

Puffy Fabric Flowers - Crafty Staci 12

Late Summer Preview

It’s August, and last time I really felt like life wasn’t made of pure chaos it was April.  I was absent from this space for much of July, but now I’ve caught my breath and I’m ready to dive back in.  To start out, I thought I’d give you a glimpse into what you can expect coming up.

First of all, the wedding was fantastic, and I have so much to share with you!  For the foreseeable future, we’re going to have Wedding Wednesdays.  I have some tutorials for things my husband and I made, and even one from the bride and groom. I also want to show you some amazing stuff, like the ring bearer box my son spent months crafting.  Don’t worry, I’ll try to slip some non-wedding projects in between those Wednesdays.

Here’s a sneak peek from their fantastic photographer, Heather Fitch.

Codi and John

I have a couple of sewing books I’ll be reviewing soon.  Super Stitches Sewing by Nicole Vasbinder and Basic Black by Sato Watanabe have been patiently sitting next to my computer.

Basic Black and Super Stitches Sewing

I also have some exciting news to share with West Coast vacationers from my friends at Undercover Tourist.  Especially timely, since I’ll be among you next month!  You can expect a new Disney craft to add to my collection soon.

Disney Crafts on Crafty Staci

All of my customizable items have been returned to my Etsy shop, including the pencil coffee sleeve that can have your favorite teacher’s name hand-embroidered on it.

2013-11-24 005

So, there’s a bit of what you can look forward to in the coming months.  I hope you’ll join me!

DIY Teacher Gifts

My baby is graduating from high school this year, so the days of apologizing to appreciating his teachers with a gift at the end of the year are pretty much over.  Actually, he’s one of those kids whose report cards always said “A pleasure to have in class”, so the gift was more about thanks for being on Team Where-Is-Tucker’s-Homework-This-Week.  If you have a teacher in your life that deserves a little something (don’t they all?), I have a few ideas for you.

DIY Teacher Gifts by Crafty Staci

I originally made this Money Gift Tea Bag as a birthday gift, but I think it would be great for a teacher with a gift card inside and maybe a few calming real tea bags thrown in with it.

Money Gift Tea Bag by Crafty Staci

What teacher doesn’t find him or herself carrying books?  This Ruffled Tote Bag is the perfect size for hauling homework to and from school.  If an actual grown-up book gets slipped in there once in a while, all the better.

Ruffled Tote Bag by Crafty Staci

I think there must be a lot of teachers out there with a Pencil Coffee Cup Sleeve.  Not only is it one of my most popular projects on this blog, but I’ve made dozens of them for my Etsy customers.  You can even buy an embroidery pattern for them from FindingPinsNeedles on Etsy and add the teacher’s name!

Pencil Coffee Cup Sleeve by Crafty Staci

I’ve noticed lots of teachers brown bag it when it comes to lunch.  A Snap Lunch Bag would be a great gift to brighten up their midday break.

Snap Lunch Bag by Crafty Staci

Even if a teacher doesn’t bring an entire lunch, there’s probably a snack on the desk most days.  Make her a Reusable Snack Bag and she won’t have to explain why she can’t share her fishy crackers with the rest of the class.

Reusable Snack Bag by Crafty Staci

If you’d prefer something with a little more flexibility for multiple uses, try this Lined Zippered Bag.  A teacher could put just about anything in here, except for an unruly student.  Or parent.

Lined Zippered Bag by Crafty Staci

The options for colors for this Floral Infinity Scarf are as endless as the bolts of knit fabric in your favorite fabric store.  School colors?  Her favorites?  Your kid’s favorites?  Something to match whatever they’re painting next week so it will go with her outfit?

Floral Infinity Scarf

I didn’t notice until I was done here that all of these projects involve sewing.  Time to break out the machine!

DIY Graduation Gifts

We have a ton of nieces and nephews.  Eleven have already graduated from high school, but if I’m counting correctly there are about 16 left who haven’t.  Since we’ve never been good about remembering all those birthdays I put in extra effort for their graduation gifts.  Don’t get me wrong – they all get cash, but I try to be creative about the way they receive it.  It snuck up on me last year, so our poor nephew only got a card with a check in it.  I think he got over it.

I have this year’s gift almost ready, which I’m show you on Wednesday.   In the meantime, here’s a few ideas I’ve used in the past:

Fabric Fortune Cookies

I made these Fabric Fortune Cookies back when that new blog smell hadn’t worn off yet.  Fortunately, the little takeout boxes I used for this are still out there. 

Fabric Fortune Cookies - Crafty Staci

Fabric Fortune Teller

This Fabric Fortune Teller was so fun to make.  It was actually the card for my son’s 8th grade graduation gift, but you could certainly slip some cash inside instead.  I’d recommend pinning it so it doesn’t fall out.

Fabric Fortune Teller - Crafty Staci

Graduation Gift Check Holder

Ok, I’ll admit this Graduation Gift Check Holder was a little odd.  It looked great closed, but it was a little tricky to figure out how you were supposed to get to the check.  I guess you could consider it a test of whether they’ve actually learned enough to escape high school.

Grad Cap Check Holder - Crafty Staci

Graduation Cap Cash Box

This Graduation Cap Cash Box is one of my favorites so far.  When my nephew grabbed the tassel and pulled, the tissue tore away and the cash came out in a long ribbon, just like I intended.  And I exhaled.

Grad Cap Cash Box - Crafty Staci

Map Memory Box

I made this Map Memory Box for my daughter when she was headed off to college.  The hearts on the top represent home and school, making it perfect for a graduate off to a new adventure.

Map Memory Box by Crafty Staci

So, I’m curious…do you give graduates money or a gift?