Hot and Cold Pillowcase

I love Oregon, but I find this time of year a little frustrating.  Don’t get me wrong, there are things I love about fall, like apples, pumpkins and boots.  Oh, the boots.  But the inconsistency in the temperature drives me a little nuts.  One minute I’m freezing, the next I’m roasting.  When you live here, you learn to dress in layers.  But nighttime is a little harder to solve.  This project was made to help a friend in the hospital who wanted something soft by his face, but I think I’ve found an easy solution to my freezer/oven problem.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 1

This is a basic pillowcase, but the secret is using woven cotton fabric on one side and super-soft Minky, or other soft fleece, on the other.  If you’re too warm, flip it to the cotton side for instant cooling.  If you’re trying to warm up, the fleece is the side you want.

To make this, you’ll need 14” of woven cotton fabric, 14” of fleece, 12” of woven cotton for the cuff and 3” of woven cotton for the accent.  The fleece will probably be wider than the cotton (54” vs 42”), so you’ll need to cut it to the same size so each piece is 14 by 42”.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 2

Sew two of the 42” sides together with wrong sides together and a slightly less than 1/4” seam.  Turn the pieces so the right sides are together and press the seam on the cotton fabric side.  Stitch again with a slightly larger than 1/4” seam.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 3

What you should have at that point is a piece that measures 27” long and 42” wide with a French seam running down the middle.  Set that piece aside for a moment. 

Fold your 3” accent piece in half with wrong sides together and press.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 4

Take your cuff piece and lay it face up on your workspace.  Mine is a little deceiving here because I happened to find a piece that was printed with two different colors.  You could certainly piece two prints together if you’d like a different color on each side of your pillow, but what’s shown here is just one piece.

Lay the accent piece on top, lining up the raw edges.  As you can see on the right, they may not match up on the end.  That’s okay – we’ll deal with it shortly.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 5

Lay the cotton/fleece piece on top of that with the right side down and raw edge matching the others.  If you did piece the cuff, make sure to match up the seams of both pieces. 

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 6

Starting from the bottom edge, carefully roll up the cotton/fleece until it’s past the center of the cuff but not all the way to the top edge.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 7

Fold the bottom edge of the cuff up and over the roll and match the raw edge to the raw edges at the top.  Pin in place.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 8

Stitch 1/4” from the raw edge all the way across.  Pull the roll from the inside out one end to turn everything right side out.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 9

I’d recommend checking your seam to make sure you caught all the layers in it before turning.  The fleece is a little slippery and you don’t want to end up with this hot mess.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 10

Cut off the accent, cuff and body to match the shortest of the three.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 11

Line up the edges with wrong sides together and stitch a scant 1/4” seam down the side and across the bottom.  I always go way under 1/4”, just make sure you’re catching both layers.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 12

Turn the pillowcase wrong side out.  Press the seam on the cotton side.  Stitch a bit over 1/4” from each edge.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 13

Turn the pillowcase right side out and press the seams one last time on the cotton side.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 14

I’m ready now, Autumn.  Bring it on.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 15

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Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Bride and Groom

Well, this is it…the last Coffee Sleeve of the Month.  These have been so much fun for me over the last year, and I hope you’ve enjoyed some of them too.  Not wanting to slip out of this series quietly, I saved the best for last.  I also cheated a little and instead of a single coffee sleeve I made two, but how could I split this couple up?

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 1

To make both of these sleeves, you’ll need this pattern (printed at full size), InsulBrite, white fabric, black fabric, 1/4” wide white ribbon, 5/8” wide black ribbon, ten white 1/4” grommets, a white button (1/2 – 1”), a black button same size, three 1/4” white buttons, 3” of white elastic cord and 3” of black elastic cord.  Tie or sew the ends of each piece of elastic together to create loops.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2 

We’ll start with the groom.  Cut out the larger pattern piece from the white fabric, the two bat-shaped pieces from black and flip the larger piece over and cut from black for the back.  Also cut a piece of InsulBrite using the larger pattern.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Stitch the three small white buttons onto the white piece at the marks on the pattern.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 4

Fold the two black bat pieces in half with wrong sides together.  Press the fold. 

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 5

Fold at the tip at the top of each piece, tapering down to the bottom point, as shown.  Press the folds.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 6

Layer the pieces, starting with the InsulBrite.  Lay the white piece on top with the buttons facing up, then the two folded black pieces.  Center the elastic on the right and add a tag on the left.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 7

Lay the back piece on top, right side down, then pin everything in place.  Stitch around with a 1/4” seam allowance, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom to one side for turning.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 8

Clip the corners and turn right side out.  Press and top stitch near the edge.  I left the top stitching off in the white section.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 9

Make the bowtie by cutting a 4” piece and a 1 1/2” piece of the 5/8” wide ribbon.  Loop the large piece with the ends at the back.  Wrap the smaller piece around and stitch at the back.  Sew it onto the sleeve by hand or machine.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 10

Sew the black button in place where the elastic reaches and wrap around a cup.

Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Now our groom needs a bride.  Cut out the large piece, the two smaller pieces and the large piece flipped over from the white fabric.  I chose to use a lace for the two smaller pieces on mine.  Also cut the InsulBrite from the large piece.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 11

Fold the two small pieces in half with right sides together.  Press the fold.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 12

Mark the spots for the grommets as shown on the pattern near the folds.  Apply the grommets according to package instructions.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 13

Layer the pieces, beginning with the InsulBrite.  Add the large white piece on top of that.  Lay the two small pieces on top of that, right side up.  Center the elastic on the right and the tag on the left.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 14

Lay the backing on, right side down, and pin in place.  Stitch around the edge with a 1/4” seam, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom to one side for turning.  Clip the corners and turn right side out.  Top stitch close to the edge all the way around.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 15

Cut 36” of the white ribbon (longer if you’d like it to be a little easier to tie at the end).  Starting at the top, lace up like a pair of shoes.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 16

When you reach the bottom, tie a bow.  Stitch the white button where the elastic reaches.  Slip onto a cup.

Bride Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

After this last year of coffee sleeves, it just feels right that these two are wrapping it all up.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 17

And I think I know just the couple, in the midst of wedding plans, that can use this set.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 18

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf

I told you about my new tank on Monday.  Well, the fabric was too pretty to only buy a tiny bit, so I went with a whole yard.  I didn’t have a plan, I just caved to the siren’s call of yet another piece of fabric that I couldn’t ignore but probably didn’t need.  My husband, standing next to me at the cutting counter, didn’t even try to stop me.  Poor guy knows better.  But it all worked out in the end, because now I have this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 1

Cut a piece of fabric 24” wide by the width of the fabric, 58” in my case.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 2

Fold with the right sides together, matching the long edges. Start stitching 2” from the end with a 1/4” seam.  Stop 2” from the other end.  I only left 1” and it made the rest of the steps a little more difficult.  If your fabric is thick you might want to even go 3 or 4”.  Press the seam to one side.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the scarf right side out.  With right sides together, match up the two short edges.  Stitch together with a 1/4” seam.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 4

Turn right side out, so the seams pull inside the scarf.  There should be a small opening where the seams intersect, like this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 5

Stitch the opening closed by hand and you’re done.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 6

By using the width of the fabric, this is the perfect length to loop around my neck twice.  It looks great with my new tank and, for now, a jacket.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 8

See, I did need that fabric after all!  Right?

Numbers 0–9 for Coffee Sleeve

Today is a great example of why I appreciate your comments so much.  Last week I posted the pattern for my Coffee Sleeve of the Month for March, which I called Class of ‘14.  It had the numbers 1 and 4 in the design to commemorate this year’s graduating class.  But one of my readers wanted to use it for something else.  Maybe she’s making one for her brother with his favorite athlete’s number and team colors or one for a friend to celebrate her 29th birthday for the tenth time.  The point is, she needed more than a 1 and a 4.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Because of the way I originally designed the pattern, it was easy to replace the numbers, so I sat down and mapped out everything from 0 to 9.  You can download the set here.  Be sure to print it at full scale so the numbers will match the available space on the pattern.

Each page looks like this:

Zero and One

It shows the number as it will look finished, the reversed number (how it will look while you’re working with it) and the pattern for actually sewing the numbers.  Some numbers, like the 0, can be sewn as one piece so they are simply numbered.  Others need to be sewn as two pieces, an A section and a B section, then A and B are sewn together.

The numbers can be plugged into the design in the areas shown in red below.  Keep in mind your design is reversed, so place your numbers accordingly.

Coffee Sleeve Template for numbers

You can download a PDF of this here, or visit the original tutorial and use the pattern there.

My thanks to Linda for asking for these!

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Rainbow

Months ago, I had the idea to make this month’s coffee sleeve as a rainbow, due to the proximity to St. Patrick’s Day.  It seemed perfect, because the arched shape of the sleeve would lend itself perfectly to a rainbow.  I even thought it would be an easy one.  Well, things didn’t exactly go to plan, but I ended up somewhere pretty good anyway.

Really, the only thing wrong with my original pattern was the lack of good math on my part.  After I sewed it together, I realized my error and (angrily) threw it in the garbage.  I could have redrawn it, adjusting to fix my mistake, but about that same time I realized it could be saved as something different.  Instead of torturing myself by trying to do it again, I changed direction and made the coffee sleeve this way instead.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

To make this sleeve, you’ll need 11 pieces of fabric, cut 4 1/2 by 1 1/2”, a 3” piece of elastic cord, fabric for the backing and InsulBrite for the inside.  You’ll also need a button and this basic coffee sleeve pattern.  If you count, you’ll see that I cut 12 of the strips, but it was a full strip too long.  Another mathtastrophe.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2

Sew the pieces together with a 1/4” seam.  Press all the seams in one direction on the back.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the fabric right side up and cut out the coffee sleeve.  If you’re not into rainbows, but would like to combine some different fabrics for a coffee sleeve, this technique works beautifully.  It’s great for using up scraps.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 4

Flip the pattern over and cut a backing piece and InsulBrite.  Sew or tie the ends of the elastic together.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 5

Layer the pieces with the rainbow right side up, the loop centered on the right, the back right side down and the InsulBrite.  Stitch around with 1/4”, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 6

Turn the sleeve right side out through the opening.  Press and topstitch all the way around near the edge.  Sew the button on where the elastic reaches.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 7

If you want to up the St. Patrick’s Day-ness a bit, you could make one of these Shamrock Barrettes and sew or clip it onto the sleeve.

Shamrock barrette 9

So, what happened to Plan A?  It turned out way too wide for a coffee sleeve, but after I got ahold of myself and pulled it back out of the trash, I realized it was the perfect size and shape for a matching mug mat!

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 1

To make the mug mat, you’ll need rainbow strips cut from this pattern, fabric for the backing and batting for the inside (you can use InsulBrite here if you’d like).

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 2

Sew the pieces together.  Since you’re matching an outward curve to an inward curve, I found it was best to just match the edges up as I sewed instead of trying to pin everything in place first.  For some reason I ended up a little short on the yellow row, but I just cut the entire edge to match.

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 3

Using this piece as a pattern, cut the backing and batting. 

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 4

Layer the pieces just like the coffee sleeve, omitting the elastic.  Sew together with a 1/4” seam, leaving an opening for turning.  Turn right side out, press and topstitch near the edge.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve and Mug Mat - Crafty Staci

How’s that for snatching victory from the jaws of defeat?

Rainbow Mug Mat and Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

On an unrelated note, this is the final day for my 4th Anniversary Giveaway winner to contact me, or I will have to draw a new name.  If you’re “maggiethecoder,” I’ve sent a few emails and you have until the end of today to get in touch with me so I can ship your prize!

Easy Lined Zippered Bag

As I promised on my 4th Anniversary Giveaway post from Monday, I’m here today to show you how to make these lined, zippered bags.  Crazy easy.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 1

These are so simple, in fact, I actually had to look back through my projects to make sure I hadn’t already covered them.  I can’t believe I haven’t, but let’s fix that, shall we?

To make one, all you need is fabric and a zipper.  For a typical purse size, your zipper should be in the 7 – 9” range.  Cut your fabric into rectangles the width of the zipper (or slightly smaller) and the height you’d like your bag, plus 1/2”.  My zipper was just over 8” from end to end, so I cut my fabric 8” by 6 1/2”.  You’ll need two pieces for the outside and two pieces for the lining.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 2

Lay one of the lining pieces right side up.  Line up the edge of the zipper with the edge of the fabric with the zipper also right side up.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 3

Add one of the outside pieces on top with the right size down.  Using a zipper foot on your sewing machine, stitch 1/4” from the edge.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 4

I don’t know about you, but even with a zipper foot I always end up with wonky stitching when I pass the zipper pull.  To avoid that, unzip the zipper a few inches before you begin stitching.  Just before you’re about to stitch past the pull, make sure your needle is fully down in the fabric and lift the presser foot.  Zip the zipper back up past your needle.  Lower the presser foot again and continue stitching.  Nice, straight seam!

Press both fabrics away from zipper.  Topstitch close to the fold.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 5

Repeat steps with the remaining outside and lining pieces on the other side of the zipper.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 6

Unzip the zipper halfway.  This step is important, because if you forget you won’t be able to turn your bag right side out.  Open out both sides.  Pin the two outside pieces to each other with right sides together, same with the lining.  The zipper should fold with the teeth facing the lining side.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 7

Stitch all the way around 1/4” from the edge, leaving 3” open at the bottom of the lining.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 8

Clip the corners.  Turn the entire bag right side out through the opening.  Push out the corners.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 9

Press the bottom seam of the lining, turning in the opening.  Stitch across the bottom close to the edge.  You could also hand stitch the opening closed if you prefer.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 10

Push the lining into the bag, iron out the wrinkles and you’re done.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 11

If you want to get a little fancier, you can make your bag so it will stand up.  You can also add a loop if you’d like to clip it to a bigger bag or use it as a wristlet.

Cut all your pieces the same, except add 1” to the height on all pieces.  Cut two pieces of iron-on interfacing the same size.  For the loop, cut fabric and interfacing 2 by 4 1/2”.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 12

Apply the interfacing to the outside pieces and the back of the loop piece.  Fold the loop in half with wrong sides together and press.  Fold both edges in to meet the middle.  Press.  Stitch close to both folds.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 13

Continue making the bag and shown above.  When you reach the point where you’re pinning the outsides and lining together, fold the loop in half and slip into the seam allowance of the outer pieces, about 1” down from the zipper.  Double stitch over the loop for added security.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 14

Once you’ve sewn the seam all the way around, stop before turning it right side out.  Flatten the corners so the seams touch and pin.  Stitch across each corner 1 1/4” from the point.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 15

Cut off the excess from each corner.  Turn right side out and finish as shown above.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 16

These are great for so many uses, take very few supplies and are quick to whip up.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 17

Be sure to visit THIS POST before midnight on Saturday, February 15, 2014 to enter to win my anniversary giveaway, which includes one of these little bags!

Quick and Easy Gift–Candle Jar Cozy

There’s nothing like a good scented candle to bring a sense of the season to a house.  I’ve disappointed many a friend and family member when they’ve walked into the house and thought I was baking something delicious, only to find out it was a candle burning.  I can evoke a sense of summer fruit or Christmas cookies and all I need is a lighter.  I almost feel guilty.

Because I’m such a fan of candles, I love to give them as gifts.  Not that a candle alone isn’t great to give and receive, but it’s nice to add a little handmade touch.  For my grandma’s birthday recently, I sent her this:

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 1 

You might recognize the fabric from the tote bag I made for her last year – she loved it.  Underneath that wrap is a Lavender Vanilla Yankee candle, which smelled even better than it sounded, but it’s the wrap I want to talk about today.  It’s quick to make and it can be moved on to the next jar when this candle is empty.  I liked it so much I made myself a Christmas version.  Don’t tell Santa.

To make this you’ll need:

outside fabric, cut to 13 1/2″ by 4”

inside fabric, cut to 13 1/2” by 4”

batting, cut to 13 1/2” by 4”

Elastic cord, 3” long

button, 5/8 – 1”

You’ll also need five to nine squares of fabric, either 3” square for the five petal flower or 2” square for the nine petal and a button for the center.  Make the flower using the tutorial shown here.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 2

Lay the outside piece face up.  Tie the ends of the elastic together using a piece of thread or zigzag on your sewing machine.  Place the elastic in the center of one end with the loop facing in.  Add a tag on the other end if you have one.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 3

Lay the inside piece over that, right side down.  Finish with the batting on top and pin everything in place.  Stitch around the outside, 1/4” from the edge, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom for turning.  I always add some extra stitching over the elastic so it doesn’t pop out.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 4

Clip the corners, turn right side out and press, turning in the opening.  Top stitch all the way around, close to the edge.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 5

Loop it around like it will be on the candle with the ends touching and mark the spot where the elastic reaches without stretching.  Stitch the button on that spot.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 6

Stitch your flower on where ever it looks best on your cozy.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 7

Wrap it around the candle and hook the loop around the button.  I made sure this was tall enough to cover the label on most 22 ounce candles.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 8

This would make a great gift for a teacher, a neighbor or my grandma.  I’ve got her covered, so go ahead and give yours to someone else.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 9

I’m pretty sure I’m going to need one of these for every season, just like my candles.

Candle Jar Cozy - Crafty Staci 10

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder

Sometime around Christmas last year, I saw a cute, fat stuffed bird and thought “I should make a chubby bird ornament!”  I wrote it in my notebook, where it sat until this year.  I came across it again, so I started sketching out a drawing.  As I worked on it, I noticed he started to look a little like a teacup.  Great, I’ll go with that.  Once I made it to drawing the actual pattern I thought “Hey, you could leave the top open and put a gift card inside!”  Sometimes things just take on a life of their own.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci

To make this bird, you’ll need this pattern, felt, craft thread and ribbon or cord.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci 2

Cut two of each pattern piece from the felt.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci 3

Stitch the wing to the body on both sides, making sure to reverse the direction for one of them.  For the rest of the pieces, put both together and stitch around the edge.  Add a black knot on the body for the eye.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci 4

Pin the two body pieces together with the wings out.  Slide the tail, feet and beak in 1/4” in the appropriate places and pin.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci 5

Stitch around the edge of the body, leaving the top open.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci 6

Cut 12” of ribbon or cord.  I remembered I had some Christmas-colored baker’s twine, so I went with that.  Tie a knot at the ends, slide into each side and stitch about three stitches above the knot to hold in place.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci 7

In addition to gift cards, he also happens to be kinda great at holding a teabag or two.

Teacup Bird Gift Card Holder - Crafty Staci 8

And when he’s done with that job, he can be an ornament.  I love this little guy.

Teacup Bird Gift Card or Teabag Holder - Crafty Staci

And on this Monday before Thanksgiving, be sure to support your favorite artisans by shopping handmade!

Shop Handmade Monday

If you’re a newsletter subscriber, watch for the first edition to hit your inbox today.  Join me here again on Wednesday for details on my Black Friday weekend sale and an additional discount code just for my readers!

Zippered Christmas Countdown Banner

I mentioned recently that I have a short attention span when it comes to counting down to Christmas.  One year, I put together packages of activities and treats for the kids using the letters of the alphabet to help my son in his struggle to memorize them.   Another time I bought stockings, embroidered numbers on them and hung them all over the house with stuff inside.  More recently we’ve been using small filled gloves to mark each day.  The one I just made tops them all.  I might actually hang on to this one for a few years.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 1

This was an ambitious project for me, especially at this busy time of year.  I mean, making 24 of anything takes a while.  But it’s all thanks to the Totally Tutorials exchange program for hooking me up with K & C Supplies on Etsy.  I was allowed to choose zippers and buttons from her shop to work with, and it was so much fun!  I’m definitely going back to order buttons for some of my Etsy items.

How do you make this fun banner?  You’ll need this pattern, fabric for the fronts and facings, fabric for the backs (the same or different), fusible interfacing, 24 three-inch zippers, 24 buttons, 24 one and a half inch wooden disks, bakers twine and paper printed with numbers.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 2

Cut a front and back for each pocket from the fabric.  I used a basic muslin for the back since I knew it wouldn’t be seen.  Cut a facing for each pocket as well.  You’ll also need one interfacing for each.  Iron the interfacing onto the wrong side of the front.  Draw a rectangle onto the interfacing as shown on the pattern.  Mark the button placement.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 3

Center the facing over the rectangle with the right sides of both fabrics together. 

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 4

Stitch over all four sides of the rectangle.  Make a cut through the center, ending about 1/4” from each ends.  From that point, clip into each corner, being careful not to cut the stitching.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 5

Turn the facing through the opening.  I find it easier if I iron each side toward the center first.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 6

Then push it through to the other side.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 7

Press it flat, then center a zipper underneath and pin in place.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 8

Stitch around the opening close to the zipper.  Using a zipper foot on your machine will allow you to get closer to the zipper and give it a neater look.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 9

Stitch a button over the mark you made for it.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 10

Unzip the zipper.  Pin the back to the front with right sides together.  Stitch all the way around.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 11

Turn right side out through the zipper.  Press.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 12

Cut a 5 inch piece of 5/8 inch wide ribbon for each pocket.  Pin to the top back of the pocket and stitch close to the upper and lower edges to create a casing.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 14

Repeat all of that 23 more times. Winking smile

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 13

I got very lucky when it came to the numbers.  I found paper printed with them and they’re the perfect size.  If you have a hard time finding something like this, another option would be to paint them on. 

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 15

Cut out the numbers and glue or decoupage them to the wood disks.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 16

Cut a 4 inch length of baker’s twine, make a loop and glue the ends of the back of the disk.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 17

Loop the twine around the button on the front of each pocket to hang.  String twine, rope, yarn, cord or ribbon through the casings on the back of the pockets.  The great thing about these is that you can string all of them together or just a few so they can be hung separately.  You could even hang them individually throughout the house!

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 18

You can slip the number inside the pocket as you count down each day.

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 19

Of course, that’s after you take out the tasty treat!

Christmas Countdown Banner - Crafty Staci 20

My thanks to Totally Tutorials and K & C Supplies!

Dammit Doll

We have a friend who has been going through a lot lately, and I was trying to think of a way to cheer her up.  I’ve made her a few things, like her pillowcase that goes along on every trip to the hospital.  But this time, I really wanted to make her laugh.

Not long ago, we were walking through downtown Bend, Oregon and I spotted a Dammit Doll in a window.  These little tension-relievers have been around longer than I have, but I hadn’t seen one in years.  If you’re not familiar with them, a Dammit Doll is not particularly attractive (who wants to take out their aggressions on something cute?) but otherwise pretty simple.  In fact, many have a folk-art look to them.  There’s also a poem explaining their use, which varies a bit from doll to doll.  The basic idea is, grab it by the legs and smack it against the wall.  Kind of like punching a pillow.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 1

To make one, you’ll need this pattern, pieced together by matching the dotted line and sides, a piece of fabric, fusible fleece (if your fabric is thick you can skip it), a button, some craft thread and stuffing.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 2

Iron the fleece onto the back of each fabric piece.  Using the pattern as a guide, sew on the button for one eye, an X for the other and the mouth using craft thread.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 3

Pin the two fabric pieces with right sides together.  Stitch a 1/4” seam around the edge, leaving 2” open on one side.  Clip all corners.  Tell me this photo doesn’t look like some kind of gingerbread man gone wrong.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 4

Turn him right side out.  Stuff the doll through the opening in the side, using a stick to push the stuffing into the legs, arms and head.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 5

Hand stitch the opening closed.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 6

If you like your Dammit Doll bald, you’re done, but I like a little 80’s rock star hair whipping around.  Cut 6” pieces of craft thread, stitch them through the top of the head at the seam about 1/4” apart, and tie knots.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 7

Trim, braid or just give it a shake.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 8

This is the poem I went with:

Dammit Doll

Whenever things don’t go so well,

And you want to hit the wall and yell

Grab your little dammit doll

It really doesn’t hurt at all

Just grasp it firmly by the legs

And find a place to slam it

And as you whack the stuffing out

Yell “Dammit, dammit, dammit!”

I hope you’ll forgive my venture into PG language territory, but my friend loves this doll.  So much, in fact, she’s asked me to make one for a friend of hers.  He may be ugly, but he brought joy to someone in pain, so I think he’s doing his job pretty well.

Dammit Doll - Crafty Staci 9