Hot Pad of the Month–March Bunny

Call it what you will – hot pad, mug rug, trivet – but I’m sure you can find a spot in your home for this little guy.  The second in my Hot Pad series, this bunny is easy to make and would make a perfect spring gift.  As I promised, he has the same shape as the Mug Hot Pad from last month.  I thought about calling him March Hare, but seriously, look at that face.  He’s definitely a bunny.

Hot Pad of the Month - March Bunny by Crafty Staci

To make one yourself, you’ll need:

  • this pattern, with the head pieced together
  • 2 heads cut from cotton fabric
  • 1 head cut from InsulBright
  • 1 head cut from cotton or cotton blend batting
  • 1 head cut from medium weight fusible interfacing
  • 4 outer ears cut from the same fabric as the head
  • 2 outer ears cut from medium weight fusible interfacing
  • 4 inner ears cut from pink cotton fabric
  • craft thread
  • embroidery pattern transfer pen

Supplies to make bunny hot pad - Crafty Staci

Adhere the interfacing to the back of one of the heads and two of the outer ears.  If you’re using different prints, the interfacing goes on the side with the face.

Attaching the interfacing

Trace the face on the paper pattern with the embroidery transfer pen, then iron onto the fabric side of the head with interfacing.  If you want to skip the embroidery, just use a fabric marker and a light source to trace the pattern onto the fabric.

Transfering the embroidery pattern

Use the craft thread to embroider the features.  I added a little pink to the nose, but that part is optional. 

Embroidered bunny face

Pin two of the inner ear pieces with right sides together.  Stitch 1/4” from the edge, leaving the bottom open.  Clip the seam at the tip, turn right side out and press.  Repeat with the remaining two pieces.

Bunny's inner ears

Pin the inner ears to the center of the outer ears with the interfacing.  Stitch around the inner ear, close to the edge.

Attaching the inner ears

Pin the remaining outer ears to these, with right sides together.  Stitch with a 1/4” seam, leaving the bottoms open.  Clip the tip, turn right side out and press.  Topstitch close to the edge.  There’s no need to topstitch the bottom edge, as it won’t be seen.

Finished bunny ears

Lay the InsulBright bunny head down, shiny side up.  Lay the embroidered fabric head, face up, on top.  Add the ears, each 3/4” from the side with the pink side down and the tips facing inward.  After pinning them at the top edge, pin the rest of the ears back with safety pins so they won’t get caught in the side seams.

Pin ears back so they don't get caught in the side seams

Lay the back head over the top of the ears, right side down.  Add the batting on top and pin all the layers together.  Stitch around 1/4” from the edge, leaving 3” open at the bottom.  Clip the corners, turn right side out, unpin the ears and press, turning in the opening.  Stitch all the way around, close to the edge.

Topstitching the bunny

The reason we didn’t put any batting inside those ears is so that he can either wear them up…

Bunny Mug Rug from Crafty Staci

…or down!

Bunny Hot Pad from Crafty Staci

I’ll bet you know someone who wouldn’t mind finding this bunny in her Easter basket!

March Bunny Hot Pad from Crafty Staci

Craft Remix: Kiss Bags

This month marks the fifth anniversary of my blog.  I have all kinds of fun and exciting events coming up to celebrate, but today I want to talk about a project I did way back in the beginning.  In fact, it was one of the first tutorials I wrote.  Don’t just me too harshly here, but it was this Lip Shaped Bag.

Lip Shaped Bag - Crafty Staci

Gotta love the combination of the dark wood banquet table and flash.  I’m no photographer, but I like to think I’ve improved some since then.  Since this was a project I shared back when I had fewer people reading this than were in the coffee shop I was at this morning, I never felt like this cute little thing got the attention it deserved.

Lip Makeup Bag by Crafty Staci

I was planning to sew this again and take better photos.  But rather than a remake, I decided on more of an inspired-by.  The original was a makeup bag, and now it’s the mama bear in this family.

Set of three Lip Bags by Crafty Staci

I started with the baby version on the right.  It’s just big enough for a tube of lip balm or hand sanitizer. 

Lip Mini Bag Pattern by Crafty Staci

In a first for me, I somehow lost every single photo I took during the process.  I guess the fact that I made it five years before that happened is something to be happy about.  So, since I have two to share here and it will help keep this post from getting too long, I’ve typed up the instructions and included them with the pattern.

Mini Kiss Bag - Crafty Staci

Fortunately, I made the handbag a different day, so all my photos from that one survived.  Hurray!

Kiss Handbag Free Pattern from Crafty Staci

While I made the smaller bags from ordinary cotton, I wanted the handbag to be more durable so it could survive the everyday beating they tend to get.  Not just mine, right?  I happened to have some red duck cloth on hand, but you could also use denim or a heavy home dec fabric.  I kinda wished I had some of that red leather left for this.  You’ll also need fabric for the lining, which can be a little lighter weight.  I used a medium weight home dec.  I wanted to make sure it wouldn’t be floppy, so I added a layer of iron-on heavy craft interfacing, but that would be optional and probably unnecessary if your fabric is stiff enough on its own.  The last item on the supply list is a white 9” zipper.

Cut out the pattern and piece it together, matching the dotted lines.  Cut out two of the lip shape from the outer fabric and two from the lining.  Cut one of the zipper facing from the outer fabric and one from the lining.  Cut two of the loop from the outer fabric.

Pieces for Kiss Bag - Crafty Staci

Iron the interfacing to the back of the fabric if you’re using it.  Draw the rectangle shown on the zipper facing onto back of the fabric pieces.

Zipper Facing - Crafty Staci

Pin the zipper facing to the bag with right sides together where it’s shown on the bag pattern.  Stitch around the rectangle you drew on previously.  Do the same with the lining.  Cut along the lines shown on pattern – down the center of the rectangle with a clip to each corner.

Applying zipper facing to kiss bag - Crafty Staci

Turn the facing to the inside and press on both the outside and lining.

Turning facing - Crafty Staci

Lay the lining piece right side down.  Center the zipper over the opening, face up. 

Zipper step one - Crafty Staci

Add the outer piece on top, right side up.  I’m not usually a fan of basting, just because I hate to have to remove it later, but you really want all three layers to stay in place while you’re sewing and this is a little thick for pins.  Some large hand stitches will do the trick.

Zipper step two - Crafty Staci

Stitch around the zipper, close to the fold.  When I flipped mine over a small section of the lining didn’t get caught in the stitching, so I added a second row about 1/8” from the first.  Remove the basting.

Zipper step three - Crafty Staci

Lay the remaining lining piece face up.  Pin the lining piece attached to the zipper on top with right sides together.  Keeping the outer piece out of the way, stitch around the lining pieces with a 3/8” seam.  Clip the corners.  The larger seam is to make sure the lining is a bit smaller and will fit easily inside the bag.

Sewing lining - Crafty Staci

Trim the seam. 

Trimming seam - Crafty Staci

Fold the loop pieces in half and press.  Turn both edges in to meet the fold and press again.  Stitch close to the side with two folds.  Fold with the two raw ends together and stitch very close to that edge to make a loop.

Lay the remaining outer piece face up and pin the outer piece with the zipper attached to it with right sides together.  Slip one loop between the two layers on both sides where the pattern indicates with the raw edges even and the loop to the inside.  Stitch with a 1/4” seam, keeping the lining out of the seam and leaving at least 3” open for turning.  You may want to leave an even larger open if your fabric is very stiff.  Stitch again over the loop ends for reinforcement.

Stitching the outer bag - Crafty Staci

Turn the bag right side out through the opening.  Press, turning the opening in 1/4”. 

Press turning in opening - Crafty Staci

Hand stitch the opening closed.  Use carabineers or jump rings to attach your strap of choice to the loops.

Attaching strap - Crafty Staci

This isn’t a big bag, but it will certainly hold the basic necessities.  You know, like your phone and lipstick.

Kiss Bag from Crafty Staci

Or the baby Kiss Bag.  Nom nom.

Kiss Handbag and Lip Mini Bag - Crafty Staci

Just in time for Valentine’s Day!

Kiss Handbag by Crafty Staci

It was fun to go back and reimagine something from the early days, so this might not be the last craft remix you see from me!

Rustic Cedar Wedding Cupcake Stands

I had put Wedding Wednesdays on hiatus for the busy holiday season, but since we’re starting out a typically mild January, I’d like to finish out the series.  I have a few more DIYs and amazing builds by my husband that just can’t go unblogged.  I’ll be wrapping it up at the end of the month, but for now, lets talk cupcakes.

Rustic Cedar Cupcake Stand on Crafty Staci

The bride and groom decided they wanted mini cupcakes rather than a traditional cake.  It ended up fitting in well with the dessert buffet and the gluten-free requirement.  They chose three flavors, but the biggest issue was what to serve them on.  We considered round wood cuts, but my husband happened to find some rough cedar that made perfect stands, and took him little time to make.

He went with three stands – one three tier and two double tier.  He cut the bottom piece for each 30 by 12”, the next piece 22 by 12” and the top for the tallest stand 14 by 12”. 

Cutting boards for cupcake stand on Crafty Staci

He used giant nails to create the layers.  These things were 12 inches long and 3/8” diameter.  They almost looked cartoonish.

Nails for cupcake stand on Crafty Staci

He marked a spot at the midpoint front to back and about 2” from the end on each side.  Then he stacked the boards, making sure the top was centered over the bottom and drilled a hole, using a bit just slightly smaller than the nail, stopping about 2/3 of the way through the bottom layer.  He repeated the process for the top step on the tallest stand.

Drilling holes for nails for cupcake stand on Crafty Staci

He centered the holes in the top tier over an opening on his table saw and hammered the nails in.

Hammering in nails on cupcake stand on Crafty Staci

He then lifted it over the bottom layer, inserting the nails into the holes.  He hammered them in, making sure it was level and the nails were fully in the bottom layer without poking all the way through.

Adding top layer of cupcake stand on Crafty Staci

He was finished with all three stands in under half an hour.  At that point in the process, time was getting short and anything that could be finished that quickly and come out looking so amazing was a win.

Finished cupcake stands on Crafty Staci

These stands were absolutely perfect for the mini cupcakes.  They fit in well with the country décor and were even the right size.  I haven’t had the heart to get rid of them yet.  I might go buy myself some cupcakes just so I can use them again.

Rustic Cedar Cupcake Stand Tutorial on Crafty Staci

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks

I love giving a little something handmade with something store bought.  It makes it just a little more personal and special.  I don’t know how many coffee cup sleeves I’ve given along with a coffee shop gift card or travel cup.  So many, in fact, I think just about everyone I know has one and it’s time for something new.  These bookmarks can be made from fabric scraps, take no time at all and would be great paired with a book or bookstore gift card.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 1

I made about two dozen of these, just using pieces of fabric from my scrap box.  You need two 4” by 4” pieces of iron-on interfacing and three 4” by 4” squares of fabric.  Cut one of the interfacing squares in half diagonally and save one half for your next bookmark.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 2

Iron the triangle of interfacing onto the fabric you want for the corner.  Iron the square of interfacing onto the piece you want to face the front behind the corner.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 3

Fold the fabric with the triangle in half diagonally, where the interfacing edge is, and press.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 4

Lay the square with interfacing on it face up.  Add the triangle on top in the upper right corner.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 5

Lay the other square on top, face down.  Pin.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 6

Stitch around the outer edge with a 1/4” seam allowance, leaving 1 – 1 1/2” open at the bottom.  Clip the corners.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 7

Turn right side out and press, turning in the opening.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 8

Stitch all the way around, close to the outer edge.

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 9

Slide a gift card inside or slip it onto a book.  This would also make a great little gift all by itself!

Quick Fabric Corner Bookmarks - Crafty Staci 10

Hot and Cold Pillowcase

I love Oregon, but I find this time of year a little frustrating.  Don’t get me wrong, there are things I love about fall, like apples, pumpkins and boots.  Oh, the boots.  But the inconsistency in the temperature drives me a little nuts.  One minute I’m freezing, the next I’m roasting.  When you live here, you learn to dress in layers.  But nighttime is a little harder to solve.  This project was made to help a friend in the hospital who wanted something soft by his face, but I think I’ve found an easy solution to my freezer/oven problem.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 1

This is a basic pillowcase, but the secret is using woven cotton fabric on one side and super-soft Minky, or other soft fleece, on the other.  If you’re too warm, flip it to the cotton side for instant cooling.  If you’re trying to warm up, the fleece is the side you want.

To make this, you’ll need 14” of woven cotton fabric, 14” of fleece, 12” of woven cotton for the cuff and 3” of woven cotton for the accent.  The fleece will probably be wider than the cotton (54” vs 42”), so you’ll need to cut it to the same size so each piece is 14 by 42”.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 2

Sew two of the 42” sides together with wrong sides together and a slightly less than 1/4” seam.  Turn the pieces so the right sides are together and press the seam on the cotton fabric side.  Stitch again with a slightly larger than 1/4” seam.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 3

What you should have at that point is a piece that measures 27” long and 42” wide with a French seam running down the middle.  Set that piece aside for a moment. 

Fold your 3” accent piece in half with wrong sides together and press.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 4

Take your cuff piece and lay it face up on your workspace.  Mine is a little deceiving here because I happened to find a piece that was printed with two different colors.  You could certainly piece two prints together if you’d like a different color on each side of your pillow, but what’s shown here is just one piece.

Lay the accent piece on top, lining up the raw edges.  As you can see on the right, they may not match up on the end.  That’s okay – we’ll deal with it shortly.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 5

Lay the cotton/fleece piece on top of that with the right side down and raw edge matching the others.  If you did piece the cuff, make sure to match up the seams of both pieces. 

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 6

Starting from the bottom edge, carefully roll up the cotton/fleece until it’s past the center of the cuff but not all the way to the top edge.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 7

Fold the bottom edge of the cuff up and over the roll and match the raw edge to the raw edges at the top.  Pin in place.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 8

Stitch 1/4” from the raw edge all the way across.  Pull the roll from the inside out one end to turn everything right side out.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 9

I’d recommend checking your seam to make sure you caught all the layers in it before turning.  The fleece is a little slippery and you don’t want to end up with this hot mess.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 10

Cut off the accent, cuff and body to match the shortest of the three.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 11

Line up the edges with wrong sides together and stitch a scant 1/4” seam down the side and across the bottom.  I always go way under 1/4”, just make sure you’re catching both layers.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 12

Turn the pillowcase wrong side out.  Press the seam on the cotton side.  Stitch a bit over 1/4” from each edge.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 13

Turn the pillowcase right side out and press the seams one last time on the cotton side.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 14

I’m ready now, Autumn.  Bring it on.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 15

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Bride and Groom

Well, this is it…the last Coffee Sleeve of the Month.  These have been so much fun for me over the last year, and I hope you’ve enjoyed some of them too.  Not wanting to slip out of this series quietly, I saved the best for last.  I also cheated a little and instead of a single coffee sleeve I made two, but how could I split this couple up?

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 1

To make both of these sleeves, you’ll need this pattern (printed at full size), InsulBrite, white fabric, black fabric, 1/4” wide white ribbon, 5/8” wide black ribbon, ten white 1/4” grommets, a white button (1/2 – 1”), a black button same size, three 1/4” white buttons, 3” of white elastic cord and 3” of black elastic cord.  Tie or sew the ends of each piece of elastic together to create loops.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2 

We’ll start with the groom.  Cut out the larger pattern piece from the white fabric, the two bat-shaped pieces from black and flip the larger piece over and cut from black for the back.  Also cut a piece of InsulBrite using the larger pattern.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Stitch the three small white buttons onto the white piece at the marks on the pattern.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 4

Fold the two black bat pieces in half with wrong sides together.  Press the fold. 

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 5

Fold at the tip at the top of each piece, tapering down to the bottom point, as shown.  Press the folds.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 6

Layer the pieces, starting with the InsulBrite.  Lay the white piece on top with the buttons facing up, then the two folded black pieces.  Center the elastic on the right and add a tag on the left.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 7

Lay the back piece on top, right side down, then pin everything in place.  Stitch around with a 1/4” seam allowance, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom to one side for turning.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 8

Clip the corners and turn right side out.  Press and top stitch near the edge.  I left the top stitching off in the white section.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 9

Make the bowtie by cutting a 4” piece and a 1 1/2” piece of the 5/8” wide ribbon.  Loop the large piece with the ends at the back.  Wrap the smaller piece around and stitch at the back.  Sew it onto the sleeve by hand or machine.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 10

Sew the black button in place where the elastic reaches and wrap around a cup.

Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Now our groom needs a bride.  Cut out the large piece, the two smaller pieces and the large piece flipped over from the white fabric.  I chose to use a lace for the two smaller pieces on mine.  Also cut the InsulBrite from the large piece.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 11

Fold the two small pieces in half with right sides together.  Press the fold.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 12

Mark the spots for the grommets as shown on the pattern near the folds.  Apply the grommets according to package instructions.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 13

Layer the pieces, beginning with the InsulBrite.  Add the large white piece on top of that.  Lay the two small pieces on top of that, right side up.  Center the elastic on the right and the tag on the left.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 14

Lay the backing on, right side down, and pin in place.  Stitch around the edge with a 1/4” seam, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom to one side for turning.  Clip the corners and turn right side out.  Top stitch close to the edge all the way around.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 15

Cut 36” of the white ribbon (longer if you’d like it to be a little easier to tie at the end).  Starting at the top, lace up like a pair of shoes.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 16

When you reach the bottom, tie a bow.  Stitch the white button where the elastic reaches.  Slip onto a cup.

Bride Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

After this last year of coffee sleeves, it just feels right that these two are wrapping it all up.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 17

And I think I know just the couple, in the midst of wedding plans, that can use this set.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 18

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf

I told you about my new tank on Monday.  Well, the fabric was too pretty to only buy a tiny bit, so I went with a whole yard.  I didn’t have a plan, I just caved to the siren’s call of yet another piece of fabric that I couldn’t ignore but probably didn’t need.  My husband, standing next to me at the cutting counter, didn’t even try to stop me.  Poor guy knows better.  But it all worked out in the end, because now I have this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 1

Cut a piece of fabric 24” wide by the width of the fabric, 58” in my case.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 2

Fold with the right sides together, matching the long edges. Start stitching 2” from the end with a 1/4” seam.  Stop 2” from the other end.  I only left 1” and it made the rest of the steps a little more difficult.  If your fabric is thick you might want to even go 3 or 4”.  Press the seam to one side.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the scarf right side out.  With right sides together, match up the two short edges.  Stitch together with a 1/4” seam.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 4

Turn right side out, so the seams pull inside the scarf.  There should be a small opening where the seams intersect, like this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 5

Stitch the opening closed by hand and you’re done.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 6

By using the width of the fabric, this is the perfect length to loop around my neck twice.  It looks great with my new tank and, for now, a jacket.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 8

See, I did need that fabric after all!  Right?

Numbers 0–9 for Coffee Sleeve

Today is a great example of why I appreciate your comments so much.  Last week I posted the pattern for my Coffee Sleeve of the Month for March, which I called Class of ‘14.  It had the numbers 1 and 4 in the design to commemorate this year’s graduating class.  But one of my readers wanted to use it for something else.  Maybe she’s making one for her brother with his favorite athlete’s number and team colors or one for a friend to celebrate her 29th birthday for the tenth time.  The point is, she needed more than a 1 and a 4.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Because of the way I originally designed the pattern, it was easy to replace the numbers, so I sat down and mapped out everything from 0 to 9.  You can download the set here.  Be sure to print it at full scale so the numbers will match the available space on the pattern.

Each page looks like this:

Zero and One

It shows the number as it will look finished, the reversed number (how it will look while you’re working with it) and the pattern for actually sewing the numbers.  Some numbers, like the 0, can be sewn as one piece so they are simply numbered.  Others need to be sewn as two pieces, an A section and a B section, then A and B are sewn together.

The numbers can be plugged into the design in the areas shown in red below.  Keep in mind your design is reversed, so place your numbers accordingly.

Coffee Sleeve Template for numbers

You can download a PDF of this here, or visit the original tutorial and use the pattern there.

My thanks to Linda for asking for these!

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Rainbow

Months ago, I had the idea to make this month’s coffee sleeve as a rainbow, due to the proximity to St. Patrick’s Day.  It seemed perfect, because the arched shape of the sleeve would lend itself perfectly to a rainbow.  I even thought it would be an easy one.  Well, things didn’t exactly go to plan, but I ended up somewhere pretty good anyway.

Really, the only thing wrong with my original pattern was the lack of good math on my part.  After I sewed it together, I realized my error and (angrily) threw it in the garbage.  I could have redrawn it, adjusting to fix my mistake, but about that same time I realized it could be saved as something different.  Instead of torturing myself by trying to do it again, I changed direction and made the coffee sleeve this way instead.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

To make this sleeve, you’ll need 11 pieces of fabric, cut 4 1/2 by 1 1/2”, a 3” piece of elastic cord, fabric for the backing and InsulBrite for the inside.  You’ll also need a button and this basic coffee sleeve pattern.  If you count, you’ll see that I cut 12 of the strips, but it was a full strip too long.  Another mathtastrophe.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2

Sew the pieces together with a 1/4” seam.  Press all the seams in one direction on the back.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the fabric right side up and cut out the coffee sleeve.  If you’re not into rainbows, but would like to combine some different fabrics for a coffee sleeve, this technique works beautifully.  It’s great for using up scraps.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 4

Flip the pattern over and cut a backing piece and InsulBrite.  Sew or tie the ends of the elastic together.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 5

Layer the pieces with the rainbow right side up, the loop centered on the right, the back right side down and the InsulBrite.  Stitch around with 1/4”, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 6

Turn the sleeve right side out through the opening.  Press and topstitch all the way around near the edge.  Sew the button on where the elastic reaches.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 7

If you want to up the St. Patrick’s Day-ness a bit, you could make one of these Shamrock Barrettes and sew or clip it onto the sleeve.

Shamrock barrette 9

So, what happened to Plan A?  It turned out way too wide for a coffee sleeve, but after I got ahold of myself and pulled it back out of the trash, I realized it was the perfect size and shape for a matching mug mat!

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 1

To make the mug mat, you’ll need rainbow strips cut from this pattern, fabric for the backing and batting for the inside (you can use InsulBrite here if you’d like).

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 2

Sew the pieces together.  Since you’re matching an outward curve to an inward curve, I found it was best to just match the edges up as I sewed instead of trying to pin everything in place first.  For some reason I ended up a little short on the yellow row, but I just cut the entire edge to match.

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 3

Using this piece as a pattern, cut the backing and batting. 

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 4

Layer the pieces just like the coffee sleeve, omitting the elastic.  Sew together with a 1/4” seam, leaving an opening for turning.  Turn right side out, press and topstitch near the edge.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve and Mug Mat - Crafty Staci

How’s that for snatching victory from the jaws of defeat?

Rainbow Mug Mat and Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

On an unrelated note, this is the final day for my 4th Anniversary Giveaway winner to contact me, or I will have to draw a new name.  If you’re “maggiethecoder,” I’ve sent a few emails and you have until the end of today to get in touch with me so I can ship your prize!

Easy Lined Zippered Bag

As I promised on my 4th Anniversary Giveaway post from Monday, I’m here today to show you how to make these lined, zippered bags.  Crazy easy.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 1

These are so simple, in fact, I actually had to look back through my projects to make sure I hadn’t already covered them.  I can’t believe I haven’t, but let’s fix that, shall we?

To make one, all you need is fabric and a zipper.  For a typical purse size, your zipper should be in the 7 – 9” range.  Cut your fabric into rectangles the width of the zipper (or slightly smaller) and the height you’d like your bag, plus 1/2”.  My zipper was just over 8” from end to end, so I cut my fabric 8” by 6 1/2”.  You’ll need two pieces for the outside and two pieces for the lining.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 2

Lay one of the lining pieces right side up.  Line up the edge of the zipper with the edge of the fabric with the zipper also right side up.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 3

Add one of the outside pieces on top with the right size down.  Using a zipper foot on your sewing machine, stitch 1/4” from the edge.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 4

I don’t know about you, but even with a zipper foot I always end up with wonky stitching when I pass the zipper pull.  To avoid that, unzip the zipper a few inches before you begin stitching.  Just before you’re about to stitch past the pull, make sure your needle is fully down in the fabric and lift the presser foot.  Zip the zipper back up past your needle.  Lower the presser foot again and continue stitching.  Nice, straight seam!

Press both fabrics away from zipper.  Topstitch close to the fold.

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Repeat steps with the remaining outside and lining pieces on the other side of the zipper.

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Unzip the zipper halfway.  This step is important, because if you forget you won’t be able to turn your bag right side out.  Open out both sides.  Pin the two outside pieces to each other with right sides together, same with the lining.  The zipper should fold with the teeth facing the lining side.

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Stitch all the way around 1/4” from the edge, leaving 3” open at the bottom of the lining.

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Clip the corners.  Turn the entire bag right side out through the opening.  Push out the corners.

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Press the bottom seam of the lining, turning in the opening.  Stitch across the bottom close to the edge.  You could also hand stitch the opening closed if you prefer.

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Push the lining into the bag, iron out the wrinkles and you’re done.

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If you want to get a little fancier, you can make your bag so it will stand up.  You can also add a loop if you’d like to clip it to a bigger bag or use it as a wristlet.

Cut all your pieces the same, except add 1” to the height on all pieces.  Cut two pieces of iron-on interfacing the same size.  For the loop, cut fabric and interfacing 2 by 4 1/2”.

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Apply the interfacing to the outside pieces and the back of the loop piece.  Fold the loop in half with wrong sides together and press.  Fold both edges in to meet the middle.  Press.  Stitch close to both folds.

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Continue making the bag and shown above.  When you reach the point where you’re pinning the outsides and lining together, fold the loop in half and slip into the seam allowance of the outer pieces, about 1” down from the zipper.  Double stitch over the loop for added security.

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Once you’ve sewn the seam all the way around, stop before turning it right side out.  Flatten the corners so the seams touch and pin.  Stitch across each corner 1 1/4” from the point.

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Cut off the excess from each corner.  Turn right side out and finish as shown above.

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These are great for so many uses, take very few supplies and are quick to whip up.

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Be sure to visit THIS POST before midnight on Saturday, February 15, 2014 to enter to win my anniversary giveaway, which includes one of these little bags!