Hot and Cold Pillowcase

I love Oregon, but I find this time of year a little frustrating.  Don’t get me wrong, there are things I love about fall, like apples, pumpkins and boots.  Oh, the boots.  But the inconsistency in the temperature drives me a little nuts.  One minute I’m freezing, the next I’m roasting.  When you live here, you learn to dress in layers.  But nighttime is a little harder to solve.  This project was made to help a friend in the hospital who wanted something soft by his face, but I think I’ve found an easy solution to my freezer/oven problem.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 1

This is a basic pillowcase, but the secret is using woven cotton fabric on one side and super-soft Minky, or other soft fleece, on the other.  If you’re too warm, flip it to the cotton side for instant cooling.  If you’re trying to warm up, the fleece is the side you want.

To make this, you’ll need 14” of woven cotton fabric, 14” of fleece, 12” of woven cotton for the cuff and 3” of woven cotton for the accent.  The fleece will probably be wider than the cotton (54” vs 42”), so you’ll need to cut it to the same size so each piece is 14 by 42”.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 2

Sew two of the 42” sides together with wrong sides together and a slightly less than 1/4” seam.  Turn the pieces so the right sides are together and press the seam on the cotton fabric side.  Stitch again with a slightly larger than 1/4” seam.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 3

What you should have at that point is a piece that measures 27” long and 42” wide with a French seam running down the middle.  Set that piece aside for a moment. 

Fold your 3” accent piece in half with wrong sides together and press.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 4

Take your cuff piece and lay it face up on your workspace.  Mine is a little deceiving here because I happened to find a piece that was printed with two different colors.  You could certainly piece two prints together if you’d like a different color on each side of your pillow, but what’s shown here is just one piece.

Lay the accent piece on top, lining up the raw edges.  As you can see on the right, they may not match up on the end.  That’s okay – we’ll deal with it shortly.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 5

Lay the cotton/fleece piece on top of that with the right side down and raw edge matching the others.  If you did piece the cuff, make sure to match up the seams of both pieces. 

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 6

Starting from the bottom edge, carefully roll up the cotton/fleece until it’s past the center of the cuff but not all the way to the top edge.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 7

Fold the bottom edge of the cuff up and over the roll and match the raw edge to the raw edges at the top.  Pin in place.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 8

Stitch 1/4” from the raw edge all the way across.  Pull the roll from the inside out one end to turn everything right side out.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 9

I’d recommend checking your seam to make sure you caught all the layers in it before turning.  The fleece is a little slippery and you don’t want to end up with this hot mess.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 10

Cut off the accent, cuff and body to match the shortest of the three.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 11

Line up the edges with wrong sides together and stitch a scant 1/4” seam down the side and across the bottom.  I always go way under 1/4”, just make sure you’re catching both layers.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 12

Turn the pillowcase wrong side out.  Press the seam on the cotton side.  Stitch a bit over 1/4” from each edge.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 13

Turn the pillowcase right side out and press the seams one last time on the cotton side.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 14

I’m ready now, Autumn.  Bring it on.

Hot and Cold Pillowcase - Crafty Staci 15

About these ads

Quilt! Knit! Stitch!

It’s been a very long time since I attended a sewing show.  In fact, it’s probably been more than 10 years.  When I saw that Quilt! Knit! Stitch! was making it’s Portland debut, I decided maybe it was time to give it another go.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch!

I got my daughter on board with the Knit! part, but I was a little skeptical that the $10 per person entry fee, plus parking, was going to be worth it.  That seemed a little steep considering I knew it was going to be full of vendors also wanting a peek into my wallet.  I have to admit, I was pleasantly surprised.  We ended up spending over three hours there!

There were two sides to the show:  display pieces and vendors.  We started on the display side, which was set up like a museum.  The first thing we came to was a Community Garden.  It was a fabric tree covered in flowers made by attendees.  They offered to let us make some to add, but we were anxious to see what was ahead.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 3

There were some truly amazing works of art.  They started with those made of yarn, like this crochet piece from local Jo Hamilton, representing the city of Portland.

Quilt Knit Stitch - Crafty Staci 2

This quilt, called Gathering Hearty Roses, was made by a group of four quilters from Japan who have been creating together for 20 years.  Aiko Miyata, Norimi Tashiro, Nobuko Kotani and Reiko Terui each made one of the hearts, then put them together.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 4

I couldn’t get a photo that would do justice to Scarlett’s Crimson by Philippa Naylor from the U.K.  She drafted the pattern, then used piecing, quilting and applique to create this beauty.  She was inspired by 1950’s couture ball gowns.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 5

I love the color and style of Indian Summer Sunset by Shirley Gisi from Colorado.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 6

Jane Sassaman was inspired to make Illinois Album by the rural areas of her own state.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 7

Cindy Hickok, from Texas, had several 3D pieces made with machine embroidery, but my favorite was See the U.S.A.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 8

Alice’s Kitchen by Miki Murakami of Japan was a real eye-catcher.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 9

We moved on to the vendor side, which seemed to go on forever.  One the first booths we stepped into remained one of our favorites.  We even went back to it at the end to buy a book and chat with the author, Kay MacKenzie.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 10

You can visit Kay at her book website and applique blog.  She had so many cute things, but the Studio sign, which is in the above book, is the first thing I want to make.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 11

There were a few trends we spotted while we shopped.  Wool felt projects were everywhere.  Bertie’s Year, from Bonnie Sullivan, was a particularly fun set of patterns.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 12

Another prevalent theme was super-tiny quilts.  It really made me want to give one a try.  Imagine how happy we were when we walked by the Moda Bakeshop booth and they handed us each of us a sweet pack of 2 1/2” squares!

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 13

You know how much I love to rip out a seam, but after holding this seam ripper from Lumenaris in my hand, I had to have one.  This thing is the perfect size and weight.  I’ve already used it, and I’m very happy to add it to my tool box.

Quilt! Knit! Stitch! - Crafty Staci 14

Overall, Quilt! Knit! Stitch! was a fun afternoon.  My daughter was hoping for more knitting and crochet patterns, but she enjoyed admiring the yarn.  I’m hoping the show returns next year!

Book Review: Basic Black

I’m here today to share another book review courtesy of Tuttle Publishing.  They have provided me with the book, but the opinions are all my own.

I’ve had the pleasure of reviewing Happy Homemade Sew Chic Kids, Happy Homemade Sew Chic and Stylish Skirts so far, and I loved things about all of them, but I’ve unintentionally saved the best for last.   I have lots of black clothes in my closet, so I was bound to find a few things here I liked, but I was pleasantly surprised at how many that turned out to be. 

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 1

This book was written by the talented Sato Watanabe.  It started as all the Tuttle books have so far – with photos of each finished garment.  Not that it has anything to do with the sewing aspect, but one thing I really liked about this book was the cheerfulness of the model.  With all of the garments being black, the happy expressions versus a typical starving model pose set a good tone.

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 2

I had a hard time narrowing down which favorites I wanted to share with you, but the first one that stood out to me was the Dress with Stitched Skirt.  I love the look of white embroidery on black.

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 3

While a good part of the book features cold weather items, like this Zip-Up Vest with High Neck…

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 4

…there are also plenty of things for the warm season too, like this Whimsical Vest in Chiffon Lace.

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 5

This High Neck Shirt with Three Quarter Length Sleeves would be great for that transition from summer to fall.

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 6

I love the neckline on this Flannel Short Coat. 

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 7

I haven’t made anything from this book yet, but it seems like there’s a pretty broad range of skill levels required for the different projects.  There is a page detailing the different tools needed, as you might find in a book for beginners.  There are many projects with only a small number of pieces to cut out and one page of instructions, like this Asymmetrical Blouse with Tape Trim.

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 8

But there are also a few more complex projects for those who’d like to stretch their wings, like this Seersucker Shirt with Collar, which requires several pieces and has three pages of instructions.

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 9

The patterns come in XS, S, M and L and need to be traced onto drafting paper or pattern tissue to use, as they’re overlapped on the pattern page included.  If you wonder why they do this, here is what 26 ordinary sewing patterns look like.

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 10

Compare that to this book, with it’s skinny envelope in the back.  Makes sense, right?

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 11

My thanks to Tuttle Publishing for asking me to review their books.  It was a real pleasure!

Book Review Basic Black - Crafty Staci 12

Friday Favorites–If the Shoe Fits…

I used to live in flip flops.  I had a favorite leather pair that I wore for years.  Then suddenly one day I couldn’t tolerate the strap between my toes.  I don’t know what happened, but I have to be very picky about what I wear now.  I made myself some flip flop covers a few years ago, which made them a little more tolerable, but they’re still not my favorite.  It makes me sad, because I love the convenience and style options! 

DIY Shoes - Crafty Staci's Friday Favorites

There is nothing cuter in this world than baby shoes.  The irony is, they don’t need them.  For a pretty solution to unnecessarily covering up those tiny toes, try these Barefoot Baby Sandals from Craftaholics Anonymous.

Barefoot Baby Sandals - Craftaholics Anonymous

For the littles that are old enough to need shoes but have trouble keeping them on their feet, Make it and Love it has the solution with these Interchangeable Flip Flop Back Straps.

Interchangeable Flip Flop Back Straps - Make it and Love it

I have some shoes very similar to the ones used by Me Making Do for this wedge sandal refashion.  This might have to happen!

Wedge Shoe Redo - Me Making Do

I love the black and white ribbon used on May Arts for these embellished flip flops.

Flip Flops with Flair - May Arts

The easy tutorial makes these Dip Dyed Shoes from Frankie seem doable.

Dip Dyed Shoes - Frankie

I’m intrigued by these DIY shoes from Pikkpack.  Apparently, you choose the ribbon and leather colors and they arrive flat-packed, Ikea-style, for you to assemble.

Pikkpack Shoes

My daughter loves her Toms.  In fact, she, all the bridesmaids and her flower girl wore them for the wedding.  Eventually, they do wear out though.  I’ll have to show her how she can give them a second life with this tutorial from Midwestern Thread.

DIY Toms Sandals - Midwestern Thread

Now here’s a flip flop I could consider.  This fabric makeover by The Mother Huddle makes them look much more toe-friendly.

Knot So Hard Flip Flops - The Mother Huddle

I wear slippers in the house, even in the summer, but sometimes it’s too hot.  These Summer Slippers from Lady Harvatine would be great for those sweltering days.

Summer Slippers - Lady Harvatine

These Macrame Sandals from My White Idea look as fun to make as they would be to wear.

Macrame Sandals - My White Idea

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–A Year in Review

It occurred to me that some of you haven’t been with me for an entire year yet, and may have missed out on some of the fun (for me anyway) that was the Coffee Cup Sleeve of the Month series.  Not to mention, I just wanted to see them all gathered up in one place, one last time.

Coffee Sleeve of the Month - A Year in Review

It all started with a Father’s Day Fish for the angler dads out there.

Fish Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

Since I was planning a month ahead, that was followed by the Pinwheel, made in patriotic red, white and blue for Independence Day.

Pinwheel Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 13

July brought what started out as Sunglasses, but using the same pattern I made the retro 3D Glasses too.

Sunglasses Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

As fall approached, I started thinking about new school clothes, which led to the New Jeans sleeve.

New Jeans Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 11

The Halloween Bat was one of the first sleeve patterns I sketched.

Coffee Sleeve of the Month Halloween Bat - Crafty Staci 1

This little Fox was so much fun to make.

Fox Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 11

This calm Christmas Tree was perfect for the hectic season.

Christmas Tree Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 11

The Pennant Banner was nice with the winter theme, but a change of fabric and this would work for any season.

Coffee Sleeve of the Month - Pennant Banner - Crafty Staci 12

Valentine’s Day had me focusing on hearts, so naturally that lead to the Heart and Arrow sleeve.

Heart and Arrow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 13

The Rainbow sleeve was a bit of a bumpy road, but worth it in the end.

Rainbow Mug Mat and Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

I had actually made a slightly different version of the Class of ‘14 sleeve a year ago, but had to hold onto the pattern until just the right time to share it this year.

Class of 14 Coffee Sleeve

Of course my final sleeve, or Bride and Groom pair of sleeves in this case, was a set I’ve been wanting to make since my daughter got engaged a year ago.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 18

That’s what my last year has looked like.  These were fun for me and I looked forward to the next one every month.  I hope you’ve enjoyed them, and maybe added one or two of them to your own collection!

Book Review: Happy Homemade Sew Chic

Just like last week, I’m going to start this off with full disclosure.  Tuttle Publishing contacted me and asked if I would review some of their sewing books here on my blog.  Having flipped through a couple of them in the past, I was happy to do so.  The books were given to me by Tuttle, but the opinions here are completely my own.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 1

Japanese sewing books have a large, faithful following.  I knew they were popular, I just hadn’t taken the time to find out what they were all about.  Apparently, it’s not uncommon for a seamstress to translate the books herself from their original Japanese.  Fortunately, the Happy Homemade series has been translated to English already, making them a quick and easy source for simple and stylish sewing projects.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 2 

There are lots of cute outfits in this book.  Many of them are made for someone a bit less curvy than I am, but there are a few options for those of us who can’t pull off a loose, tunic style.  In fact, the first time I flipped through it, I thought there wasn’t really anything in this book for me.  When I looked through it again and examined some of the drawings I realized there were many things I could wear.  I’d recommend giving it a thorough read before deciding for yourself.

One of my favorites is this Straight-Cut Tiered Skirt.  This style is often designed to be too short for me, but this one is a perfect length.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 3

The garment I most want to make is this Jacket with Back Tie.  It’s such a simple style and would look great with so many things.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 4

I could see myself wearing this Sleeveless Blouse with Frill.  In fact, I’m taking a trip to Disneyland in the fall, and this seems like a perfect vacation top.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 5

Like the kids’ version last week, this book is very thorough in its layout of basic tools, techniques and tips for a beginning sewer.  I really like the page that describes some of the commonly used sewing terms, such as facings and pockets.  The drawings are very clear, making it handy for a beginner just learning such things or a more advanced sewer needing a basic refresher.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 6

There are 20 projects included in this book.  Needless to say, in order to provide full-sized patterns for each one they needed to be printed in such a way that they would all fit in one envelope.  That means they are overlapped and printed on both sides, so you need to plan on tracing all of the pieces.  If you’ve ever tried to use one size from a multi-size pattern, you know that’s probably going to make your life easier in the end anyway.  You also need to add a seam allowance, which is easy enough since you’re already tracing and is detailed in the book.  The one thing I found odd was that the suggested seam allowance was 3/8”.  I’ve always been told to use 5/8” with garments, but since you’re adding it yourself you can do whatever is comfortable for you.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 7

I’m very impressed with the diagrams included with each project, showing exactly how a specific part of the assembly is done.

Book Review - Happy Homemade Sew Chic - Crafty Staci 8

I have to tell you, I did have one disappointment in reading this book.  That adorable little top on the front cover is not one of the patterns included.  Maybe I can look forward to it in a future edition!  Otherwise, I really enjoyed Happy Homemade Sew Chic, and I think the Japanese sewing book genre can count another fan.

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Bride and Groom

Well, this is it…the last Coffee Sleeve of the Month.  These have been so much fun for me over the last year, and I hope you’ve enjoyed some of them too.  Not wanting to slip out of this series quietly, I saved the best for last.  I also cheated a little and instead of a single coffee sleeve I made two, but how could I split this couple up?

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 1

To make both of these sleeves, you’ll need this pattern (printed at full size), InsulBrite, white fabric, black fabric, 1/4” wide white ribbon, 5/8” wide black ribbon, ten white 1/4” grommets, a white button (1/2 – 1”), a black button same size, three 1/4” white buttons, 3” of white elastic cord and 3” of black elastic cord.  Tie or sew the ends of each piece of elastic together to create loops.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2 

We’ll start with the groom.  Cut out the larger pattern piece from the white fabric, the two bat-shaped pieces from black and flip the larger piece over and cut from black for the back.  Also cut a piece of InsulBrite using the larger pattern.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Stitch the three small white buttons onto the white piece at the marks on the pattern.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 4

Fold the two black bat pieces in half with wrong sides together.  Press the fold. 

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 5

Fold at the tip at the top of each piece, tapering down to the bottom point, as shown.  Press the folds.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 6

Layer the pieces, starting with the InsulBrite.  Lay the white piece on top with the buttons facing up, then the two folded black pieces.  Center the elastic on the right and add a tag on the left.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 7

Lay the back piece on top, right side down, then pin everything in place.  Stitch around with a 1/4” seam allowance, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom to one side for turning.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 8

Clip the corners and turn right side out.  Press and top stitch near the edge.  I left the top stitching off in the white section.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 9

Make the bowtie by cutting a 4” piece and a 1 1/2” piece of the 5/8” wide ribbon.  Loop the large piece with the ends at the back.  Wrap the smaller piece around and stitch at the back.  Sew it onto the sleeve by hand or machine.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 10

Sew the black button in place where the elastic reaches and wrap around a cup.

Groom Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Now our groom needs a bride.  Cut out the large piece, the two smaller pieces and the large piece flipped over from the white fabric.  I chose to use a lace for the two smaller pieces on mine.  Also cut the InsulBrite from the large piece.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 11

Fold the two small pieces in half with right sides together.  Press the fold.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 12

Mark the spots for the grommets as shown on the pattern near the folds.  Apply the grommets according to package instructions.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 13

Layer the pieces, beginning with the InsulBrite.  Add the large white piece on top of that.  Lay the two small pieces on top of that, right side up.  Center the elastic on the right and the tag on the left.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 14

Lay the backing on, right side down, and pin in place.  Stitch around the edge with a 1/4” seam, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom to one side for turning.  Clip the corners and turn right side out.  Top stitch close to the edge all the way around.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 15

Cut 36” of the white ribbon (longer if you’d like it to be a little easier to tie at the end).  Starting at the top, lace up like a pair of shoes.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 16

When you reach the bottom, tie a bow.  Stitch the white button where the elastic reaches.  Slip onto a cup.

Bride Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

After this last year of coffee sleeves, it just feels right that these two are wrapping it all up.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 17

And I think I know just the couple, in the midst of wedding plans, that can use this set.

Bride and Groom Coffee Cup Sleeves - Crafty Staci 18

Book Review: Happy Homemade Sew Chic Kids

I’m going to start this off with full disclosure.  Tuttle Publishing contacted me and asked if I would review some of their sewing books here on my blog.  Having flipped through a couple of them in the past, I was happy to do so.  The books were given to me by Tuttle, but the opinions here are completely my own.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 1

I’m starting off this week with the first title that caught my attention, Happy Homemade: Sew Chic Kids by Ruriko Yamada.  Put a cute kid on the cover and that’s all the marketing strategy you need for me.  Three of them, wearing my current favorite color palette, and I’m all in.  Fortunately, the rest of the book didn’t disappoint either.

If a beginning sewer were to pick up this book and flip through it, they might assume it was for a more intermediate skill level.  The sheer amount of information and diagrams could be intimidating at first glance.  But that’s exactly why this book would be great for anyone.  The sections on basic tools, needles and thread and sewing machine tips bring a newbie up to speed on what they need to know to get started, then the explanations on how to deal with the pattern pieces and fabric bring it home.  My advice is to read it through before deciding whether it fits into your skill level.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 9

The book starts out with some basic information on sizing, then dives right into the simple, clean photos of each garment.  I’m not just saying this – I love every single project.  I kept deciding on a favorite, then turning the page to find another.  I did finally narrow it down to four.

This sweet little dress could be made in so many fabrics and worn with leggings, with a top underneath or all by itself.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 2

This top is really my absolute favorite thing in the whole book.  There’s just something so fun about it.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 3

The author didn’t forget about the boys either.  I remember when my son was small it was always tough to find things to make for him.  These shorts are simple but easy to customize.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 4

This shirt is classic, and yet just a little different with the stand-up collar.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 5

There are 20 projects included in this book.  Needless to say, in order to provide full-sized patterns for each one they needed to be printed in such a way that they would all fit in one envelope.  That means they are overlapped and printed on both sides, so you need to plan on tracing all of the pieces.  If you’ve ever tried to use one size from a multi-size pattern, you know that’s probably going to make your life easier in the end anyway.  You also need to add a seam allowance, which is easy enough since you’re already tracing and is detailed in the book.  The one thing I found odd was that the suggested seam allowance was 3/8”.  I’ve always been told to use 5/8” with garments, but since you’re adding it yourself you can do whatever is comfortable for you.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 6

I’ll admit, I was a bit puzzled when I read the instructions for the first project.  Steps 2 and 4 are on the page, but no others.  It wasn’t until I spotted the guide telling me make it according to the instructions on another project, substituting the two steps, that it all made sense.  Rather than repeat they just redirect.  Again, it cuts down on what would otherwise be an enormous book.  There are handy flip-outs on the inside of the front and back covers to help keep your place when you need to go back and forth.

The layouts for cutting the pattern pieces are very clear and the diagrams for how to complete each step are very helpful.  Like my cookbooks, I want my sewing books to have lots of pictures.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 7

Overall, I really love this book.  The garments fit kids sizes 2 through 8, and I don’t currently have anyone to sew for that fits that demographic.  However, all of the projects are so simple and classic, I feel like it’s a book I can pull off the shelf a few years from now and none of it will be outdated. 

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 8

Next week I’ll be reviewing Happy Homemade: Sew Chic by Yoshiko Tsukiori.  Have you sewn with any of the Happy Homemade books?

Spring Etsy Sale

I’m having a big Spring Sale in my Etsy shop!  I decided to take a hard look at what was I had on hand and be brutal about making room for some new things.  Kill your darlings, so they say.  I’m not going to pretend to understand why some of these cute items are still here while others are gone, but it’s time to move on.

Everything below is currently 50% off the original price.  But wait, there’s more – through this Friday, April 18, 2014, use the code SPRINGSHIPPING for free shipping on any order within the United States!  For my international customers, use the code SPRINGWORLD for a $4 discount on shipping.

Anything here would make great a Mother’s Day gift!

Black and White Crosshatch and Pink Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Black and White Crosshatch and Pink Sling Bag

Keys and Red Polka Dot Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Keys and Red Polka Dot Sling Bag

Ninja Monkey Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Ninja Monkey Sling Bag

Tattoo and Fire Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Tattoo and Fire Sling Bag

Black and Flowers Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Black and Flowers Sling Bag

Beige and Happy Words Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Beige and Happy Words Sling Bag

CF Memory Card Mini Wallet - CraftyStaci

CF Memory Card Mini Wallet

Camera Strap Business Card Holder - CraftyStaci

Camera Strap Business Card Holder

3-D Glasses Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

3-D Glasses Coffee Cup Sleeve

Fish Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Fish Coffee Cup Sleeve

Leaf Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Leaf Coffee Cup Sleeve

Snowflake Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Snowflake Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Trees Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Trees Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Stockings Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Stockings Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Tree Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Tree Coffee Cup Sleeve

Lovebirds Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Lovebirds Coffee Cup Sleeve

Grey and Yellow Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Grey and Yellow Coffee Cup Sleeve

Honey Bee Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Honey Bee Coffee Cup Sleeve

Mom Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Mom Coffee Cup Sleeve

Ninja Monkey Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Ninja Monkey Coffee Cup Sleeve

Tattoo Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Tattoo Coffee Cup Sleeve

Tropical Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Tropical Coffee Cup Sleeve

Typewriter Keys Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Typewriter Keys Coffee Cup Sleeve

Vacation Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Vacation Coffee Cup Sleeve

Watermelon Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Watermelon Coffee Cup Sleeve

Cowboy Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Cowboy Coffee Cup Sleeve

Camera Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Camera Coffee Cup Sleeve

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf

I told you about my new tank on Monday.  Well, the fabric was too pretty to only buy a tiny bit, so I went with a whole yard.  I didn’t have a plan, I just caved to the siren’s call of yet another piece of fabric that I couldn’t ignore but probably didn’t need.  My husband, standing next to me at the cutting counter, didn’t even try to stop me.  Poor guy knows better.  But it all worked out in the end, because now I have this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 1

Cut a piece of fabric 24” wide by the width of the fabric, 58” in my case.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 2

Fold with the right sides together, matching the long edges. Start stitching 2” from the end with a 1/4” seam.  Stop 2” from the other end.  I only left 1” and it made the rest of the steps a little more difficult.  If your fabric is thick you might want to even go 3 or 4”.  Press the seam to one side.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the scarf right side out.  With right sides together, match up the two short edges.  Stitch together with a 1/4” seam.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 4

Turn right side out, so the seams pull inside the scarf.  There should be a small opening where the seams intersect, like this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 5

Stitch the opening closed by hand and you’re done.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 6

By using the width of the fabric, this is the perfect length to loop around my neck twice.  It looks great with my new tank and, for now, a jacket.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 8

See, I did need that fabric after all!  Right?