Book Review: Happy Homemade Sew Chic Kids

I’m going to start this off with full disclosure.  Tuttle Publishing contacted me and asked if I would review some of their sewing books here on my blog.  Having flipped through a couple of them in the past, I was happy to do so.  The books were given to me by Tuttle, but the opinions here are completely my own.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 1

I’m starting off this week with the first title that caught my attention, Happy Homemade: Sew Chic Kids by Ruriko Yamada.  Put a cute kid on the cover and that’s all the marketing strategy you need for me.  Three of them, wearing my current favorite color palette, and I’m all in.  Fortunately, the rest of the book didn’t disappoint either.

If a beginning sewer were to pick up this book and flip through it, they might assume it was for a more intermediate skill level.  The sheer amount of information and diagrams could be intimidating at first glance.  But that’s exactly why this book would be great for anyone.  The sections on basic tools, needles and thread and sewing machine tips bring a newbie up to speed on what they need to know to get started, then the explanations on how to deal with the pattern pieces and fabric bring it home.  My advice is to read it through before deciding whether it fits into your skill level.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 9

The book starts out with some basic information on sizing, then dives right into the simple, clean photos of each garment.  I’m not just saying this – I love every single project.  I kept deciding on a favorite, then turning the page to find another.  I did finally narrow it down to four.

This sweet little dress could be made in so many fabrics and worn with leggings, with a top underneath or all by itself.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 2

This top is really my absolute favorite thing in the whole book.  There’s just something so fun about it.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 3

The author didn’t forget about the boys either.  I remember when my son was small it was always tough to find things to make for him.  These shorts are simple but easy to customize.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 4

This shirt is classic, and yet just a little different with the stand-up collar.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 5

There are 20 projects included in this book.  Needless to say, in order to provide full-sized patterns for each one they needed to be printed in such a way that they would all fit in one envelope.  That means they are overlapped and printed on both sides, so you need to plan on tracing all of the pieces.  If you’ve ever tried to use one size from a multi-size pattern, you know that’s probably going to make your life easier in the end anyway.  You also need to add a seam allowance, which is easy enough since you’re already tracing and is detailed in the book.  The one thing I found odd was that the suggested seam allowance was 3/8”.  I’ve always been told to use 5/8” with garments, but since you’re adding it yourself you can do whatever is comfortable for you.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 6

I’ll admit, I was a bit puzzled when I read the instructions for the first project.  Steps 2 and 4 are on the page, but no others.  It wasn’t until I spotted the guide telling me make it according to the instructions on another project, substituting the two steps, that it all made sense.  Rather than repeat they just redirect.  Again, it cuts down on what would otherwise be an enormous book.  There are handy flip-outs on the inside of the front and back covers to help keep your place when you need to go back and forth.

The layouts for cutting the pattern pieces are very clear and the diagrams for how to complete each step are very helpful.  Like my cookbooks, I want my sewing books to have lots of pictures.

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 7

Overall, I really love this book.  The garments fit kids sizes 2 through 8, and I don’t currently have anyone to sew for that fits that demographic.  However, all of the projects are so simple and classic, I feel like it’s a book I can pull off the shelf a few years from now and none of it will be outdated. 

Sew Chic Kids Book Review - Crafty Staci 8

Next week I’ll be reviewing Happy Homemade: Sew Chic by Yoshiko Tsukiori.  Have you sewn with any of the Happy Homemade books?

About these ads

Spring Etsy Sale

I’m having a big Spring Sale in my Etsy shop!  I decided to take a hard look at what was I had on hand and be brutal about making room for some new things.  Kill your darlings, so they say.  I’m not going to pretend to understand why some of these cute items are still here while others are gone, but it’s time to move on.

Everything below is currently 50% off the original price.  But wait, there’s more – through this Friday, April 18, 2014, use the code SPRINGSHIPPING for free shipping on any order within the United States!  For my international customers, use the code SPRINGWORLD for a $4 discount on shipping.

Anything here would make great a Mother’s Day gift!

Black and White Crosshatch and Pink Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Black and White Crosshatch and Pink Sling Bag

Keys and Red Polka Dot Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Keys and Red Polka Dot Sling Bag

Ninja Monkey Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Ninja Monkey Sling Bag

Tattoo and Fire Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Tattoo and Fire Sling Bag

Black and Flowers Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Black and Flowers Sling Bag

Beige and Happy Words Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Beige and Happy Words Sling Bag

CF Memory Card Mini Wallet - CraftyStaci

CF Memory Card Mini Wallet

Camera Strap Business Card Holder - CraftyStaci

Camera Strap Business Card Holder

3-D Glasses Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

3-D Glasses Coffee Cup Sleeve

Fish Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Fish Coffee Cup Sleeve

Leaf Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Leaf Coffee Cup Sleeve

Snowflake Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Snowflake Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Trees Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Trees Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Stockings Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Stockings Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Tree Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Tree Coffee Cup Sleeve

Lovebirds Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Lovebirds Coffee Cup Sleeve

Grey and Yellow Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Grey and Yellow Coffee Cup Sleeve

Honey Bee Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Honey Bee Coffee Cup Sleeve

Mom Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Mom Coffee Cup Sleeve

Ninja Monkey Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Ninja Monkey Coffee Cup Sleeve

Tattoo Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Tattoo Coffee Cup Sleeve

Tropical Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Tropical Coffee Cup Sleeve

Typewriter Keys Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Typewriter Keys Coffee Cup Sleeve

Vacation Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Vacation Coffee Cup Sleeve

Watermelon Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Watermelon Coffee Cup Sleeve

Cowboy Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Cowboy Coffee Cup Sleeve

Camera Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Camera Coffee Cup Sleeve

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf

I told you about my new tank on Monday.  Well, the fabric was too pretty to only buy a tiny bit, so I went with a whole yard.  I didn’t have a plan, I just caved to the siren’s call of yet another piece of fabric that I couldn’t ignore but probably didn’t need.  My husband, standing next to me at the cutting counter, didn’t even try to stop me.  Poor guy knows better.  But it all worked out in the end, because now I have this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 1

Cut a piece of fabric 24” wide by the width of the fabric, 58” in my case.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 2

Fold with the right sides together, matching the long edges. Start stitching 2” from the end with a 1/4” seam.  Stop 2” from the other end.  I only left 1” and it made the rest of the steps a little more difficult.  If your fabric is thick you might want to even go 3 or 4”.  Press the seam to one side.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the scarf right side out.  With right sides together, match up the two short edges.  Stitch together with a 1/4” seam.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 4

Turn right side out, so the seams pull inside the scarf.  There should be a small opening where the seams intersect, like this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 5

Stitch the opening closed by hand and you’re done.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 6

By using the width of the fabric, this is the perfect length to loop around my neck twice.  It looks great with my new tank and, for now, a jacket.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 8

See, I did need that fabric after all!  Right?

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank

I’m an Oregon girl, born and raised.  I generally take the seasons in stride, waiting patiently for the sun to peek out when it’s good and ready.  This year is a little different.  Granted, we didn’t have the relentless winter they had back east, but it still felt long and cold.  I am beyond ready for spring.  If it won’t come to me, I’m going to try summoning it with my wardrobe.  Yes, my toes are a little chilly in my sandals today, but I’m optimistic.  Maybe this tank will do the trick.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 1

This started as a simple, unembellished pink tank from Old Navy and a piece of lightweight knit fabric.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 2

Measure the distance you’d like the fabric to overlap onto the front.  In my case, that was 1/2”.  Multiply that number by 3, then add 1/2”.  You’ll also need to measure the arm and neck holes, adding about 3 or 4” to each.  In my case, I cut two pieces that were 2 by 24” for the arms and one 2 by 35” for the neck.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 3

Fold one end of a strip about 1/4” to the wrong side, then line up the edge with the arm hole.  Stitch away from the edge the distance of your original measurement, 1/2” for me.  Be sure to use a stretch or knit stitch so your openings will still stretch.  Continue all the way around until you cover the fold where you started.  Cut off the excess strip.  Repeat for the other arm.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 4

Press the trim away from the tank.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 5

Fold the trim over the edge to the inside of the tank.  Make sure it covers the stitching line.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 6

From the front, stitch all the way around close to the fold as shown below.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 7

Repeat the process for the neck.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 8

Doesn’t this top doesn’t look like spring?

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 10

Join me again on Wednesday and I’ll show you what else I made from this pretty floral fabric!

Numbers 0–9 for Coffee Sleeve

Today is a great example of why I appreciate your comments so much.  Last week I posted the pattern for my Coffee Sleeve of the Month for March, which I called Class of ‘14.  It had the numbers 1 and 4 in the design to commemorate this year’s graduating class.  But one of my readers wanted to use it for something else.  Maybe she’s making one for her brother with his favorite athlete’s number and team colors or one for a friend to celebrate her 29th birthday for the tenth time.  The point is, she needed more than a 1 and a 4.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Because of the way I originally designed the pattern, it was easy to replace the numbers, so I sat down and mapped out everything from 0 to 9.  You can download the set here.  Be sure to print it at full scale so the numbers will match the available space on the pattern.

Each page looks like this:

Zero and One

It shows the number as it will look finished, the reversed number (how it will look while you’re working with it) and the pattern for actually sewing the numbers.  Some numbers, like the 0, can be sewn as one piece so they are simply numbered.  Others need to be sewn as two pieces, an A section and a B section, then A and B are sewn together.

The numbers can be plugged into the design in the areas shown in red below.  Keep in mind your design is reversed, so place your numbers accordingly.

Coffee Sleeve Template for numbers

You can download a PDF of this here, or visit the original tutorial and use the pattern there.

My thanks to Linda for asking for these!

Friday Favorites–Building a Foundation

Since I’ve been talking about foundation piecing all week, it seemed appropriate to end the week with some beautiful projects I’ve come across in my research.  I just love how this technique makes something fairly easy to put together look like it took a month to create.  I won’t tell you if won’t.

Friday Favorites - Foundation Pieced Quilt Blocks

I think I found what I didn’t even know my sewing room was missing – this sweet quilt block from Charise Creates.

Sew Out Loud from Charise Creates

Since I live in the forest, I have a thing for the furry residents around here.  I wonder if the bears would appreciate this Bear Cub from Whims and Fancies.

Bear Cub from Whims and Fancies

This Red Herring Block from Quiet Play is a good example of how paper piecing makes very skinny pieces possible.

Red Herring Blocks from Quiet Play

Paper piecing can also make curves a bit less intimidating, like the ones in this Scrappy Potholder from Fairy Face Designs.

Scrappy Potholder from Fairy Face Designs

Do you say pop or soda?  I understand it’s regional, but while I once called it pop, being married to a soda guy for over 20 years quietly converted me.  Whatever you call it, this Pop Bottle Curtain from Sew Take a Hike is just cute.

More of a tea drinker?  Check out this Teapot from Pink Penguin.

Teapot from Pink Penguin

Sew Mama Sew combined the work of two artists to create this Sprout and Juice Quilt.

Juice Glass Block from Sew Mama Sew

The Night Quilter combined blocks from ShannonMac on Craftsy in a creative way to make this cheery wall hanging.

Oops by Night Quilter

Foundation paper piecing can be pretty simple, like this heart from Craft Couture by T.C.

Heart from Craft Couture by TC

Or you can go all out, like this masterpiece from Harry Potter Paper Piecing.

Harry Potter by HP Paperpiecing

Tell me, have you tried foundation piecing?  What was your experience like?  I think I’m hooked!

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Class of ‘14

It came to my attention after I wrote this that you might be interested in using numbers other than 1 and 4, especially if you’ve found this after we’ve moved past the class of ’14.  You can find all of the numbers, 0 – 9, here which can be plugged into the design in any combination you’d like!

 

My baby is graduating from high school this spring.  I’m having a hard time wrapping my brain around that idea.  It seems like yesterday he was playing with Hot Wheels and wishing he could be Buzz Lightyear, and now we’re talking about college and career.  But whether I’m ready for it or not, it’s happening, so I’m trying to get onboard.  I’m starting with a coffee cup sleeve, commemorating his graduating class.  This one is going to his school as part of a giveaway for seniors who’ve completed their financial aid applications, but make it in their school colors and it would be a great gift for any graduate.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

This is where all that information on foundation paper piecing that I shared on Monday is going to come in handy.  If you didn’t get a chance to go over it, at the very least watch Crafty Gemini’s video before digging into this project.

As with every coffee sleeve before it, you’ll need fabric, InsulBrite, elastic cord and a button.  You’ll also need to print one copy of this pattern, which includes three pages.  The full sleeve pattern is included twice, because you’ll need two of them.  The labels on the pieces are shown in red for the parts that should be a contrasting color, represented in yellow on my project.  Be sure you print at full size.

We’re going to start by making the numbers.  Cut each of the numbers apart on the pattern.  I like to start by cutting out a larger-than-necessary piece of fabric for each piece I’ll be sewing.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2

To start, place piece A1 on the wrong side of the pattern with the wrong side of the fabric facing the paper.  You can hold it up to a light source to make sure it’s placed correctly.  Ignore the backward letters on my pattern pieces.  I was working from the rough draft when I made my sleeve.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Add the next piece, which will be A2, with right sides of the fabric facing each other and enough overlap on the sewing line for a 1/4” seam.  This is the back side of the pattern.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 4

Reduce the stitch size on your machine to around 1 1/4 – 1 1/2.  Stitch on the front of the pattern along the line, overstitching by a bit on each end.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 5

Fold the pattern back along the stitching and cut the seam allowance to 1/4”.  Some people feel like this step is optional, but it keeps everything a little neater and less confusing for me.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 6

With a dry iron, press piece A2 back.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 7

Repeat the process with pieces A3 and A4.  Cut around the piece along the outer edge of the pattern, which leaves a 1/4” seam allowance all the way around.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 8

And it should look something like this.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 9

Sew the B pieces together the same way, then attach section A to section B.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 10

Now that you have the 1 finished, complete the 4 the same way.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 11

Beginning with the 1, treat it as your first piece on the full coffee sleeve pattern.  Place it carefully and accurately.  Continue with the next pieces, which will be C and D.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 12

Add the remaining pieces through F, then add M to the end.  Set the entire piece aside.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 13

Repeat on the second paper print-out, using the 4 as your starting piece and continuing with J through L and adding N to the end.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 14

Trim the inside of both pieces leaving a 1/4” seam allowance.  Stitch the two pieces together down the center with right sides together.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 15

Flip over and cut around the outside edge of the pattern.  A seam allowance is already accounted for.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 16

Carefully tear away all of the paper.  Tweezers might come in handy for the small pieces in the seams.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 17

Cut out the backing and the InsulBrite. Cut a 3” piece of the elastic cord and sew or tie the ends of it together.  Layer the pieces with the InsulBrite, the front, the elastic centered on the right side, a tag on the left if you use one and the back face down on top.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 18

Stitch around with a 1/4” seam, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom for turning.  Clip the corners, turn right-side out and press, turning in the opening.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 19

Stitch all the way around, close to the edge.  Sew the button on the side opposite the elastic.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 20

Hook the elastic around the button, slide it onto a cup and you’re done.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 21

Are you a little dizzy after all of that?  I know it seems complex, but once you understand the basics of foundation paper piecing it’s actually pretty easy.  I look at it like this – at least it’s not as difficult and complicated as graduating from high school!

Foundation Paper Piecing Basics

If you’re a quilter, you are probably familiar with foundation paper piecing.  If not, you’ve likely seen the technique used, you just didn’t know how it was done.  It makes the most intimidating designs with tiny pieces manageable.  Basically, foundation paper piecing is sewing fabric onto a paper pattern in a specific order to create a picture or design.  This wall hanging from Quiltmaker is a good example (all of the blocks can be downloaded on their site).

Seasons and Celebrations from Quiltmaker

For me, paper piecing is like driving a stick shift.  I know how to do it, but so much time passes in between that I have to refresh my memory every time before I get started.  If you’ve never tried paper piecing, or need a reminder like me, this video from Crafty Gemini is one of the best I’ve seen.  It’s simple, but all of the important points are there.  There is also a good video from Connecting Threads.  If you’d rather read that watch, check out the aptly named series from The Littlest Thistle – Foundation Paper Piecing for the Terrified

Foundation Paper Piecing for the Terrified from The Littest Thistle

The reason I’m bringing up foundation paper piecing today is that I’ll be sharing a project on Wednesday that uses the technique.  I’ve give you a hint…it’s Coffee Sleeve of the Month time again!

I wanted to try out a small project before I tackled my coffee sleeve, so I decided to make a Confetti Star Block from During Quiet Time on Craftsy.  It’s piecing in sections, then the sections are joined, which is similar to my pattern.  I’ll tell you right now, some people are really good at cutting their pieces with a minimum amount of waste, but I am not those people.  My pieces are big and sloppy.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 1

I followed the directions that came with the pattern, which involved building each of the four sections.  One thing I re-learned on my first row of stitching is that you have to make sure each piece is going to cover it’s intended area, which may involve some planning, such as turning this one so it would be oriented correctly when it’s flipped back.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 2

I assembled each section, which gave me this.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 3

I left the paper attached to sew the sections together, but I think I would remove it next time.  It was a little tricky getting some of it out of the seams.  Also, when the instructions tell you to shorten your stitch length, don’t forget to do it.  It makes removing the paper MUCH easier.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 4

After I removed all of the paper and gave it a good, final press, I was pretty happy with the result.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 5

A closer view reveals that some of my corners didn’t match up perfectly, but I still think it’s cute enough to use somewhere.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 6

Are you ready to try a foundation paper pieced coffee cup sleeve?  Great…I’ll see you on Wednesday!

Friday Favorites–St. Patrick’s Day

I’ve spent my entire life thinking I had some Irish ancestry, even on days other than St. Patrick’s.  As it turns out, I’m more likely Scottish.  I even have a family castle and a once-every-seven-year reunion in the homeland.  I’m also a distant relative of Sean Connery.  As exciting as all that is, it’s a little disappointing too.  I liked being able to claim a little legitimacy in my Kiss Me, I’m Irish pin.  But aren’t we all just a little bit Irish this time of year?

First of all, just for fun, here’s the castle:

Duart Castle

I don’t think they’re going to let me move in anytime soon, but I might be lucky enough to visit one day.

10 St. Patrick's Day DIYs - Crafty Staci

Corned beef and cabbage is really an American version of Irish food, but dishes like this Authentic Irish Colcannon from Boulder Locavore are much more traditional.

Authentic Irish Colcannon by Boulder Locavore

I love the simplicity of this St. Patrick’s Day Clover Canvas Art from Lovely Clusters.  I actually think this would work outside of the holiday as well.

St Patrick's Clover Canvas Art by Lovely Clusters

How fun are these Leprechaun Hat S’mores from Hostess with the Mostess?

Sometimes basic and inexpensive projects wind up being the most impressive, like these Thrifty Hurricanes from Two Twenty One.

Thrifty Hurricanes by Two Twenty One

This Leprechaun Crunch from Yesterday on Tuesday looks fun and tasty, but what I want to know is, who has to eat all of the Lucky Charms with no marshmallows?!?

Leprechaun Crunch by Yesterday on Tuesday

Again, so simple, but this Leafy Spring Wreath from Dollar Store Crafts would be perfect for a subtle St. Patrick’s Day decoration.

Leafy Spring Wreath by Dollar Store Crafts

I know some kids who would enjoy this St. Patrick’s Day Coin Dig from The Pleasantest Thing.  And I know one who hates getting messy and really, really wouldn’t.

St Patrick's Day Gold Dig by Pleasantest Thing

These Shamrock Cupcakes from Easy Cake Decorating are just brilliant.

I think the hardest part of this felt St. Patrick’s Day Garland from A Subtle Revelry would be cutting out all those shamrocks.

Easy St Patrick's Day Garland by A Subtle Revelry

I think the photo says it all when it comes to this Pistachio Pound Cake from The Candid Appetite.

Pistachio Pound Cake by The Candid Appetite

Go find someone to pinch (on Monday!)

Skirt Save

The police department my husband works for holds an awards ceremony every year.  It’s always nice to see the officers and citizens recognized for their hard work and bravery, and it’s a good chance for our law enforcement family to catch up with each other.  Tonight’s the night, so I decided to make a skirt to wear that I’d bought the ingredients for last week. 

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 1

I have a few comments about this pattern.  First of all, I never pay more than about $2.50 for a clothing pattern.  There’s already too much risk involved for me without paying $15 to $18.  This one was $1.  Second, I like the different style options available on this one.  Last, but not least, this is only a 2 hour pattern if you are paying attention and not trying to do several other things at the same time.  The rest of this story can only be blamed on me, not Simplicity.

Cutting this out was a breeze, as it only uses three pattern pieces.  The first step is just stitching the two from pieces together, then the sides.  Piece of cake.  Had I just stuck with one thing at a time, instead of bouncing between this project and another, everything would still be fine.  You can probably imagine by now, that’s not how this went.  This is what the waistband should look like once it’s sewn on.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 2

After stitching the original seam, stitching a second seam next to it for added strength and zigzag stitching over the edge to make sure my unravel-prone fabric would stay together, I held the skirt up and found this.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 3

That, my friends, is the outside of the skirt.  With the exposed seam for the waistband.  I just sat there staring at it in disbelief.  A lifetime of sewing, and I was going to lose this skirt to a dumb mistake.  There was no way this fabric was going to survive ripping out three seams and still be viable.  I thought about cutting off the waistband and starting over, since I had a little bit of fabric left to cut a new one, but that would mess with the shape and length of the skirt. 

Instead of throwing a fit, like I wanted to, I laid it down gently on my work table and walked away for a few minutes.  That moment of clarity was enough for me to realize all I needed to do was cover up that seam.  Bias tape to the rescue!

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 4

This tape, folded, is about 3/4” wide.  I ironed the seam down toward the bottom, then pinned the end of the tape on, barely covering the seam at the top to prevent shrinking the casing for the elastic.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 5

For the rest of the tape, I just laid it in place as I sewed close to the top edge.  When I reached the end, I cut the tape, folded the end under and stitched it over the top of where I had started.  I sewed close to the bottom edge to finish it off.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 6

After that crisis was defused, I closely followed the directions to add the elastic and hem the bottom.  Once I was finished, I tried it on and was happily surprised.  I love the black trim at the top and would actually add it on purpose if I had it to do over again.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 7

What did I learn from this?  It’s especially important when working on a project outside my norm, like clothing, that I pay attention to what I’m doing and not try to multitask.  Also, don’t throw away a project just because I made a mistake.  I can guarantee I’ll get to put that life lesson to use again someday.