Friday Favorites–Building a Foundation

Since I’ve been talking about foundation piecing all week, it seemed appropriate to end the week with some beautiful projects I’ve come across in my research.  I just love how this technique makes something fairly easy to put together look like it took a month to create.  I won’t tell you if won’t.

Friday Favorites - Foundation Pieced Quilt Blocks

I think I found what I didn’t even know my sewing room was missing – this sweet quilt block from Charise Creates.

Sew Out Loud from Charise Creates

Since I live in the forest, I have a thing for the furry residents around here.  I wonder if the bears would appreciate this Bear Cub from Whims and Fancies.

Bear Cub from Whims and Fancies

This Red Herring Block from Quiet Play is a good example of how paper piecing makes very skinny pieces possible.

Red Herring Blocks from Quiet Play

Paper piecing can also make curves a bit less intimidating, like the ones in this Scrappy Potholder from Fairy Face Designs.

Scrappy Potholder from Fairy Face Designs

Do you say pop or soda?  I understand it’s regional, but while I once called it pop, being married to a soda guy for over 20 years quietly converted me.  Whatever you call it, this Pop Bottle Curtain from Sew Take a Hike is just cute.

More of a tea drinker?  Check out this Teapot from Pink Penguin.

Teapot from Pink Penguin

Sew Mama Sew combined the work of two artists to create this Sprout and Juice Quilt.

Juice Glass Block from Sew Mama Sew

The Night Quilter combined blocks from ShannonMac on Craftsy in a creative way to make this cheery wall hanging.

Oops by Night Quilter

Foundation paper piecing can be pretty simple, like this heart from Craft Couture by T.C.

Heart from Craft Couture by TC

Or you can go all out, like this masterpiece from Harry Potter Paper Piecing.

Harry Potter by HP Paperpiecing

Tell me, have you tried foundation piecing?  What was your experience like?  I think I’m hooked!

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Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Class of ‘14

It came to my attention after I wrote this that you might be interested in using numbers other than 1 and 4, especially if you’ve found this after we’ve moved past the class of ’14.  You can find all of the numbers, 0 – 9, here which can be plugged into the design in any combination you’d like!

 

My baby is graduating from high school this spring.  I’m having a hard time wrapping my brain around that idea.  It seems like yesterday he was playing with Hot Wheels and wishing he could be Buzz Lightyear, and now we’re talking about college and career.  But whether I’m ready for it or not, it’s happening, so I’m trying to get onboard.  I’m starting with a coffee cup sleeve, commemorating his graduating class.  This one is going to his school as part of a giveaway for seniors who’ve completed their financial aid applications, but make it in their school colors and it would be a great gift for any graduate.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

This is where all that information on foundation paper piecing that I shared on Monday is going to come in handy.  If you didn’t get a chance to go over it, at the very least watch Crafty Gemini’s video before digging into this project.

As with every coffee sleeve before it, you’ll need fabric, InsulBrite, elastic cord and a button.  You’ll also need to print one copy of this pattern, which includes three pages.  The full sleeve pattern is included twice, because you’ll need two of them.  The labels on the pieces are shown in red for the parts that should be a contrasting color, represented in yellow on my project.  Be sure you print at full size.

We’re going to start by making the numbers.  Cut each of the numbers apart on the pattern.  I like to start by cutting out a larger-than-necessary piece of fabric for each piece I’ll be sewing.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2

To start, place piece A1 on the wrong side of the pattern with the wrong side of the fabric facing the paper.  You can hold it up to a light source to make sure it’s placed correctly.  Ignore the backward letters on my pattern pieces.  I was working from the rough draft when I made my sleeve.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Add the next piece, which will be A2, with right sides of the fabric facing each other and enough overlap on the sewing line for a 1/4” seam.  This is the back side of the pattern.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 4

Reduce the stitch size on your machine to around 1 1/4 – 1 1/2.  Stitch on the front of the pattern along the line, overstitching by a bit on each end.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 5

Fold the pattern back along the stitching and cut the seam allowance to 1/4”.  Some people feel like this step is optional, but it keeps everything a little neater and less confusing for me.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 6

With a dry iron, press piece A2 back.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 7

Repeat the process with pieces A3 and A4.  Cut around the piece along the outer edge of the pattern, which leaves a 1/4” seam allowance all the way around.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 8

And it should look something like this.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 9

Sew the B pieces together the same way, then attach section A to section B.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 10

Now that you have the 1 finished, complete the 4 the same way.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 11

Beginning with the 1, treat it as your first piece on the full coffee sleeve pattern.  Place it carefully and accurately.  Continue with the next pieces, which will be C and D.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 12

Add the remaining pieces through F, then add M to the end.  Set the entire piece aside.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 13

Repeat on the second paper print-out, using the 4 as your starting piece and continuing with J through L and adding N to the end.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 14

Trim the inside of both pieces leaving a 1/4” seam allowance.  Stitch the two pieces together down the center with right sides together.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 15

Flip over and cut around the outside edge of the pattern.  A seam allowance is already accounted for.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 16

Carefully tear away all of the paper.  Tweezers might come in handy for the small pieces in the seams.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 17

Cut out the backing and the InsulBrite. Cut a 3” piece of the elastic cord and sew or tie the ends of it together.  Layer the pieces with the InsulBrite, the front, the elastic centered on the right side, a tag on the left if you use one and the back face down on top.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 18

Stitch around with a 1/4” seam, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom for turning.  Clip the corners, turn right-side out and press, turning in the opening.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 19

Stitch all the way around, close to the edge.  Sew the button on the side opposite the elastic.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 20

Hook the elastic around the button, slide it onto a cup and you’re done.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 21

Are you a little dizzy after all of that?  I know it seems complex, but once you understand the basics of foundation paper piecing it’s actually pretty easy.  I look at it like this – at least it’s not as difficult and complicated as graduating from high school!

Foundation Paper Piecing Basics

If you’re a quilter, you are probably familiar with foundation paper piecing.  If not, you’ve likely seen the technique used, you just didn’t know how it was done.  It makes the most intimidating designs with tiny pieces manageable.  Basically, foundation paper piecing is sewing fabric onto a paper pattern in a specific order to create a picture or design.  This wall hanging from Quiltmaker is a good example (all of the blocks can be downloaded on their site).

Seasons and Celebrations from Quiltmaker

For me, paper piecing is like driving a stick shift.  I know how to do it, but so much time passes in between that I have to refresh my memory every time before I get started.  If you’ve never tried paper piecing, or need a reminder like me, this video from Crafty Gemini is one of the best I’ve seen.  It’s simple, but all of the important points are there.  There is also a good video from Connecting Threads.  If you’d rather read that watch, check out the aptly named series from The Littlest Thistle – Foundation Paper Piecing for the Terrified

Foundation Paper Piecing for the Terrified from The Littest Thistle

The reason I’m bringing up foundation paper piecing today is that I’ll be sharing a project on Wednesday that uses the technique.  I’ve give you a hint…it’s Coffee Sleeve of the Month time again!

I wanted to try out a small project before I tackled my coffee sleeve, so I decided to make a Confetti Star Block from During Quiet Time on Craftsy.  It’s piecing in sections, then the sections are joined, which is similar to my pattern.  I’ll tell you right now, some people are really good at cutting their pieces with a minimum amount of waste, but I am not those people.  My pieces are big and sloppy.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 1

I followed the directions that came with the pattern, which involved building each of the four sections.  One thing I re-learned on my first row of stitching is that you have to make sure each piece is going to cover it’s intended area, which may involve some planning, such as turning this one so it would be oriented correctly when it’s flipped back.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 2

I assembled each section, which gave me this.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 3

I left the paper attached to sew the sections together, but I think I would remove it next time.  It was a little tricky getting some of it out of the seams.  Also, when the instructions tell you to shorten your stitch length, don’t forget to do it.  It makes removing the paper MUCH easier.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 4

After I removed all of the paper and gave it a good, final press, I was pretty happy with the result.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 5

A closer view reveals that some of my corners didn’t match up perfectly, but I still think it’s cute enough to use somewhere.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 6

Are you ready to try a foundation paper pieced coffee cup sleeve?  Great…I’ll see you on Wednesday!

Friday Favorites–Meet the Muppets

After working on my Kermit bookmark earlier in the week, I’ve been having flashbacks to the Muppet Show.  I remember when it premiered.  I had spent my young years watching Sesame Street, and then it was as if someone had recognized I was not a little kid anymore and made a grown-up version of my show.  Yep, I was quite sophisticated for a seven-year-old.

Friday Favorites - 10 Muppet Crafts - Crafty Staci

There are no instructions for these Muppet Show Cookies at 1 Fine Cookie, but if you’re talented with one of those frosting-squisher-outer-thingies you could probably pull these off.

The Muppet Show Cookies from 1 Fine Cookie

If you’re a knitter, you might want to give these Jim Henson Muppet Charts from Robin Barnhill on Ravelry a spin.

Jim Henson Muppet Charts on Ravelry

There is some debate about whether the creatures from Sesame Street are technically Muppets.  I’m not here to debate.  Jim Henson was a genius, no matter which camp you’re in and I will be referring to all his creations as Muppets today.  That said, I just love this Yip Yip Alien from WikiHow.

Yip Yip Alien from Wikihow

The best thing about these Sesame Street Hats from Girl in Air is that they’re available not only in kid sizes, but adult as well.

Sesame Street Hats from Girl in Air

Can you imagine a more fun way to hold your glasses than a Muppet?  Check out these Muppet Glasses Holders from djonesgirl on Craftster.

Muppet Glasses Holder from djonesgirl on Craftster

Did you see the Muppet commercial during the Super Bowl?  You can print your own Muppet-jacked car from Spoonful.

Muppet Car from Spoonful

With a little shrink paper you can have your own Muppet charm bracelet.  You can find the template on Disney Family.

Muppet Charms from Disney Family

For a quick, easy Muppet fix, try these Muppet Hand Puppets from Spoonful.

Muppet Hand Puppets from Spoonful

Who hasn’t wished at some point they could be a Muppet?  Rad Megan shows you how you can be Kermit for a day.

Kermit from Rad Megan

You guys, you can design and buy your own Muppet!  They’re called Muppet Whatnot Puppets, and they run just under $100 from Fao Schwarz.  So tempting…

The Muppet Whatnot Workshop at Fao Schwarz

Are you going to see the new Muppet movie tonight?

Kermit the Frog Magnetic Bookmark

I just finished booking a family trip to Disneyland for the fall, so I’m definitely in a Disney mood.  With that and the new Muppet movie coming out this week, it seemed like the perfect time to create a craft around my favorite little frog:  Kermit.

Kermit the Frog Magnetic Bookmark - Crafty Staci

This bookmark is made from cardstock and has magnets on the inside so it can hold your place in any book.  For the full instructions and pattern, come visit me over at Undercover Tourist!

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait

I find it a little difficult to find healthy snacks when I’m away from home.  It’s even worse that I often end up in the coffee shop, full of cookies and other fat-laden baked goods.  I’ve given up a lot of things for this diet, but I still budget in the occasional Starbucks drink now and then.  Recently, I discovered their yogurt parfaits in the refrigerated section.  The berry version is only 220 calories and it’s delicious.  It didn’t take long before I was wondering if it was something I could replicate at home.  Oh, yes I can.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 1

This actually doesn’t take a ton of different ingredients, and one batch can make 4 – 8 servings, so you’re set for breakfast for at least a few days. 

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 2

Start the granola first, so it can bake while you whip up the fruit compote.

Granola

  • 3/4 cup oats (gluten-free, if that’s how you roll)
  • 2 teaspoons packed brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • 2 teaspoons coconut oil, melted
  • 1 teaspoon molasses
  • dash of salt

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.  Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl.  Spread on an ungreased baking sheet.  Bake for 10 minutes, then stir.  Bake for 15 minutes longer, stirring every 5 minutes, or until golden brown.  Pour onto wax paper to cool.  Once it has cooled, break up some of the larger pieces.  Makes about 1 1/4 cups.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 3

Once the granola is in the oven, you can start the fruit compote. 

Strawberry Blueberry Compote

  • 1 cup sliced strawberries (5 – 6 large)
  • 1/2 cup blueberries (frozen is fine)
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons water

Combine the strawberries, sugar, lemon juice and water in a small saucepan.  Cook over medium low heat until bubbly.  Continue to cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture starts to thicken, around 5 minutes.  Add the blueberries and cook just until they’re heated.  Remove from heat and cool.  Makes about 1 cup.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 4

You can also cook both berries together from the beginning, just be aware that while the flavor is there, your blueberries will not be recognizable in the final product.

To assemble the parfait, start with 2 tablespoons of the berry compote on the bottom for 8 servings, or 1/4 cup for 4 servings.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 5

Add 1/2 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt for either number of servings.  I like Zoi.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 6

Top with 1/4 cup granola for 4 servings or 2 tablespoons for 8.  You should have a little granola left over.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 7

After you’re done looking at how pretty it is, mix it all together and enjoy.  Oh, and it’s still pretty.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 8

One thing I really love about the Starbucks parfait is that the granola is in its own container so it doesn’t mix with the yogurt and get soggy.  You can just dump it in when you’re ready.  After a little brainstorming I solved that problem with my homemade version too.

Save and wash an empty applesauce container.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Crafty Staci 9

Fill it with the granola and top it with a piece of foil.  Put it upside down on top of the wide-mouth jar lid and twist on the ring.  The foil keeps it in place!  I shook this and it didn’t budge.

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Reuse applesauce container to hold the granola - Crafty Staci

Here’s the REALLY good news.  If you make this recipe into four servings (as shown in the first photo above), each one will have 206 calories, which is 14 fewer than Starbucks’.  If you make it into eight servings, as shown in my awesome travel container here, it’s only 125 calories!

Greek Yogurt and Berries Parfait - Reuse applesauce container to hold the granola - Crafty Staci 2

Healthy on-the-go snack problem?  Solved.

Friday Favorites–St. Patrick’s Day

I’ve spent my entire life thinking I had some Irish ancestry, even on days other than St. Patrick’s.  As it turns out, I’m more likely Scottish.  I even have a family castle and a once-every-seven-year reunion in the homeland.  I’m also a distant relative of Sean Connery.  As exciting as all that is, it’s a little disappointing too.  I liked being able to claim a little legitimacy in my Kiss Me, I’m Irish pin.  But aren’t we all just a little bit Irish this time of year?

First of all, just for fun, here’s the castle:

Duart Castle

I don’t think they’re going to let me move in anytime soon, but I might be lucky enough to visit one day.

10 St. Patrick's Day DIYs - Crafty Staci

Corned beef and cabbage is really an American version of Irish food, but dishes like this Authentic Irish Colcannon from Boulder Locavore are much more traditional.

Authentic Irish Colcannon by Boulder Locavore

I love the simplicity of this St. Patrick’s Day Clover Canvas Art from Lovely Clusters.  I actually think this would work outside of the holiday as well.

St Patrick's Clover Canvas Art by Lovely Clusters

How fun are these Leprechaun Hat S’mores from Hostess with the Mostess?

Sometimes basic and inexpensive projects wind up being the most impressive, like these Thrifty Hurricanes from Two Twenty One.

Thrifty Hurricanes by Two Twenty One

This Leprechaun Crunch from Yesterday on Tuesday looks fun and tasty, but what I want to know is, who has to eat all of the Lucky Charms with no marshmallows?!?

Leprechaun Crunch by Yesterday on Tuesday

Again, so simple, but this Leafy Spring Wreath from Dollar Store Crafts would be perfect for a subtle St. Patrick’s Day decoration.

Leafy Spring Wreath by Dollar Store Crafts

I know some kids who would enjoy this St. Patrick’s Day Coin Dig from The Pleasantest Thing.  And I know one who hates getting messy and really, really wouldn’t.

St Patrick's Day Gold Dig by Pleasantest Thing

These Shamrock Cupcakes from Easy Cake Decorating are just brilliant.

I think the hardest part of this felt St. Patrick’s Day Garland from A Subtle Revelry would be cutting out all those shamrocks.

Easy St Patrick's Day Garland by A Subtle Revelry

I think the photo says it all when it comes to this Pistachio Pound Cake from The Candid Appetite.

Pistachio Pound Cake by The Candid Appetite

Go find someone to pinch (on Monday!)

Stained Glass

Have I ever told you guys I work with stained glass?  After four years, it’s getting a little difficult to remember what I’ve brought up and what I haven’t.  I can’t even remember what I ate for breakfast, so there’s not much hope of that changing.  Anyway, let me tell you about my glass work.

It all started many years ago when I was a loan officer for a credit union.  I had a long drive to work, and on the way was a stained glass shop.  I would always admire the projects hanging in the windows and I thought to myself that one day I’d take a class and learn how it was done.  That went on for a few years, then I quit my job to stay home with the kidlets.  I never lost my interest in glass, but honestly the idea of having sharp glass around the little ones was a little too terrifying.

Ten years ago, I happened to skim through our local community college’s list of non-credit classes, and there it was – Stained Glass for Beginners.  I showed up for the first class to find only eight students, including myself.  By the second session we were down to six.  One of the girls said she was only there because her grandmother had bequeathed some glass tools to her, and her friend came along because her boyfriend worked for a window company.  I was the the lone student on the last day.  Ours was the second-to-last time the class was ever offered, so I’m glad I took the opportunity when I did.

Our instructor was a guy who looked like he belonged on a beach somewhere.   He started class by telling us a story of dropping a piece of glass and splitting his foot between his toes, as a warning to wear sturdy shoes.  He stood in front of us in flip-flops.  However, he was an excellent teacher.  In contrast to my fear that my kids would get within 100 yards of anything sharp, he was teaching his 7-year-old twin boys how to cut and solder.

My first project was this sun, which is still hanging in my dining room.  I love that beautiful, swirly glass…

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 1

The next thing I tackled in class was this coffee cup.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 2

Starting a third project was a little ambitious, but I was hooked and I didn’t have any of the big tools of my own yet, so doing it at home wasn’t an option.  I finished this candleholder just as my instructor was packing up his stuff.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 3

By the time Christmas came that year, my sweet husband had made sure I had the tools I needed to work with glass at home.  I made this hummingbird for my daughter.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 4

And Spiderman for my son.  This was a tough one because of all those skinny fingers.  Of course, later the kids both decided they had outgrown these and gave them back to me, but Spidey hangs above my craft room door.  All that work was NOT getting stored away in a box somewhere.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 5

I made this fairy for my grandma.  I was so happy with the way she turned out.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 6

I made a few more things from patterns I had found in books or online, like this brown bear who is an all-time favorite of mine.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 7

But then I got brave and started creating my own designs.  I started with fairly simple projects, like this mountain.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 8

I really love making things that are three-dimensional, so these flowers sit on top of the fan, as does the tree on the mountain above.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 9

Another design feature I really like to use is curled wire, like this pumpkin’s tendrils, so I use that one quite often.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 10

I started to get brave, and made my daughter this flip-flop Zen garden.  She’s held onto this one so far.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 11

You wouldn’t know it by looking at it, but the light shade over my dining room table is probably the most difficult glass project I’ve ever made.  It looks simple, but the beautiful red glass that had me under its spell wanted to break everywhere except where I meant for it to.  These were supposed to be solid panels, but if you look closely you can see that I had to add some seams to fit some pieces back together.  Fortunately, it’s much more interesting this way.

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 12

In addition to everything here, I’ve made lots of gifts, jewelry and Christmas ornaments.  My most recent project was this candle holder for an Etsy teammate in a gift exchange I participated in…

Stained Glass - Crafty Staci 13

…two years ago.  That’s right.  All my glass supplies have been sitting collecting dust for over two years.  Glass is like fabric – it’s pretty, so I would buy it without a thought to what I might do with it.  I have a large box of glass and everything I need to make something.  Or several somethings. 

Now for the big question:  Have I cut myself?  Oh, yes.  More times than I can count, although never so badly I’ve needed stitches.  I’ve also burned myself and probably added a little extra lead to my system.  But I keep coming back.  I think it’s time to break out the glass again.

Quick Tip–Craft Floss Storage

I told you last week about how I’m going to be a bit limited on what I can talk about here between now and the end of July so I don’t ruin any surprises for my daughter’s wedding.  I’ve been thinking about starting a series showing you some quick sewing and craft tips I’ve learned over the years, so this seems like a great time for that.  Welcome to the first in my series of Quick Tips!

I use craft floss, or embroidery floss often when I’m crafting. 

Quick Tip - Craft Floss Storage - Crafty Staci 1

The problem is, it tends to end up looking something like this, despite my best efforts.

Quick Tip - Craft Floss Storage - Crafty Staci 2

If I throw it back in the box this way, the next time I need it I’ll take one look at that mess and move on.  I realized my empty sewing thread spools might help solve the issue.

Quick Tip - Craft Floss Storage - Crafty Staci 3

These are the perfect size to hold a skein of craft thread.  The end slips right in where the thread end is normal held at the bottom of the spool.

Quick Tip - Craft Floss Storage - Crafty Staci 4

Neat and tidy!

Friday Favorites–DIY Recipe Storage

Since two of my more recent projects have involved finding ways to store my crazy recipe collection, this seemed like a good day to find out what other people are doing about it.  There are so many ideas out there that at least I know I’m not the only one with a recipe hoarding issue.

Friday Favorites - DIY Recipe Storage - Crafty Staci

A recipe box is a pretty traditional method of storage, but I loved the added personality of the spoon on this Bent-Spoon Recipe Box from Country Living.

Bent Spoon Recipe Box from Country Living

What I really love about this one are the chipboard tabs inside this recipe box from Paper Vine.

Recipe Box from Paper Vine

This Turn-Style Recipe Holder from Debbie Hodge is pretty enough to double as kitchen décor.

Turning Recipe Holder from Debbie Hodge

This Easy Recipe Card Holder from Make and Takes is perfect for those times you just need to focus on the one card.

Easy Recipe Card Holder from Make and Takes

If you want to be able to plan your recipes for the week, this hanging recipe holder from Shivaya Naturals will come in handy.

Meal Time Organizing from Shivaya Naturals

This recipe binder from Food Storage Made Easy is simple and smart.  The recipes are color-coded on cardstock!

How to Organize Your Recipes from Food Storage Made Easy

If you don’t have a dedicated cookbook shelf in your kitchen who says you can’t add one?  Check out this Easy Kitchen Island Addition from The Endearing Home.

Easy Kitchen Island Addition from The Endearing Home

In addition to all the recipes I’ve printed and written on cards, I also use my tablet in the kitchen.  Based on the food splatter in some of my more often-used cookbooks, I try to keep it off the counter and protected.  This Swing Down Cookbook Rack from Family Handy Man would probably save my screen.

Swing-down Cookbook Rack from Family Handyman

This Kitchen Tablet Holder from Mamie Jane’s is made from a cutting board and Scrabble tile holder.  Love this.

Kitchen Tablet Holder from Mamie Jane's

This Cookbook Chair from Thistlewood Farms definitely wins for most unique storage idea.

Cookbook Chair from Thistlewood Farms

Now I kinda want to go cook something.