Spring Etsy Sale

I’m having a big Spring Sale in my Etsy shop!  I decided to take a hard look at what was I had on hand and be brutal about making room for some new things.  Kill your darlings, so they say.  I’m not going to pretend to understand why some of these cute items are still here while others are gone, but it’s time to move on.

Everything below is currently 50% off the original price.  But wait, there’s more – through this Friday, April 18, 2014, use the code SPRINGSHIPPING for free shipping on any order within the United States!  For my international customers, use the code SPRINGWORLD for a $4 discount on shipping.

Anything here would make great a Mother’s Day gift!

Black and White Crosshatch and Pink Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Black and White Crosshatch and Pink Sling Bag

Keys and Red Polka Dot Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Keys and Red Polka Dot Sling Bag

Ninja Monkey Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Ninja Monkey Sling Bag

Tattoo and Fire Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Tattoo and Fire Sling Bag

Black and Flowers Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Black and Flowers Sling Bag

Beige and Happy Words Sling Bag - CraftyStaci

Beige and Happy Words Sling Bag

CF Memory Card Mini Wallet - CraftyStaci

CF Memory Card Mini Wallet

Camera Strap Business Card Holder - CraftyStaci

Camera Strap Business Card Holder

3-D Glasses Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

3-D Glasses Coffee Cup Sleeve

Fish Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Fish Coffee Cup Sleeve

Leaf Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Leaf Coffee Cup Sleeve

Snowflake Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Snowflake Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Trees Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Trees Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Stockings Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Stockings Coffee Cup Sleeve

Christmas Tree Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Christmas Tree Coffee Cup Sleeve

Lovebirds Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Lovebirds Coffee Cup Sleeve

Grey and Yellow Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Grey and Yellow Coffee Cup Sleeve

Honey Bee Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Honey Bee Coffee Cup Sleeve

Mom Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Mom Coffee Cup Sleeve

Ninja Monkey Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Ninja Monkey Coffee Cup Sleeve

Tattoo Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Tattoo Coffee Cup Sleeve

Tropical Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Tropical Coffee Cup Sleeve

Typewriter Keys Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Typewriter Keys Coffee Cup Sleeve

Vacation Coffee Cup Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Vacation Coffee Cup Sleeve

Watermelon Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Watermelon Coffee Cup Sleeve

Cowboy Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Cowboy Coffee Cup Sleeve

Camera Coffee Cup Sleeve - CraftyStaci

Camera Coffee Cup Sleeve

About these ads

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf

I told you about my new tank on Monday.  Well, the fabric was too pretty to only buy a tiny bit, so I went with a whole yard.  I didn’t have a plan, I just caved to the siren’s call of yet another piece of fabric that I couldn’t ignore but probably didn’t need.  My husband, standing next to me at the cutting counter, didn’t even try to stop me.  Poor guy knows better.  But it all worked out in the end, because now I have this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 1

Cut a piece of fabric 24” wide by the width of the fabric, 58” in my case.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 2

Fold with the right sides together, matching the long edges. Start stitching 2” from the end with a 1/4” seam.  Stop 2” from the other end.  I only left 1” and it made the rest of the steps a little more difficult.  If your fabric is thick you might want to even go 3 or 4”.  Press the seam to one side.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the scarf right side out.  With right sides together, match up the two short edges.  Stitch together with a 1/4” seam.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 4

Turn right side out, so the seams pull inside the scarf.  There should be a small opening where the seams intersect, like this:

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 5

Stitch the opening closed by hand and you’re done.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 6

By using the width of the fabric, this is the perfect length to loop around my neck twice.  It looks great with my new tank and, for now, a jacket.

Easy Floral Infinity Scarf - Crafty Staci 8

See, I did need that fabric after all!  Right?

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank

I’m an Oregon girl, born and raised.  I generally take the seasons in stride, waiting patiently for the sun to peek out when it’s good and ready.  This year is a little different.  Granted, we didn’t have the relentless winter they had back east, but it still felt long and cold.  I am beyond ready for spring.  If it won’t come to me, I’m going to try summoning it with my wardrobe.  Yes, my toes are a little chilly in my sandals today, but I’m optimistic.  Maybe this tank will do the trick.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 1

This started as a simple, unembellished pink tank from Old Navy and a piece of lightweight knit fabric.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 2

Measure the distance you’d like the fabric to overlap onto the front.  In my case, that was 1/2”.  Multiply that number by 3, then add 1/2”.  You’ll also need to measure the arm and neck holes, adding about 3 or 4” to each.  In my case, I cut two pieces that were 2 by 24” for the arms and one 2 by 35” for the neck.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 3

Fold one end of a strip about 1/4” to the wrong side, then line up the edge with the arm hole.  Stitch away from the edge the distance of your original measurement, 1/2” for me.  Be sure to use a stretch or knit stitch so your openings will still stretch.  Continue all the way around until you cover the fold where you started.  Cut off the excess strip.  Repeat for the other arm.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 4

Press the trim away from the tank.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 5

Fold the trim over the edge to the inside of the tank.  Make sure it covers the stitching line.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 6

From the front, stitch all the way around close to the fold as shown below.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 7

Repeat the process for the neck.

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 8

Doesn’t this top doesn’t look like spring?

Adding Floral Trim to a Basic Tank - Crafty Staci 10

Join me again on Wednesday and I’ll show you what else I made from this pretty floral fabric!

Numbers 0–9 for Coffee Sleeve

Today is a great example of why I appreciate your comments so much.  Last week I posted the pattern for my Coffee Sleeve of the Month for March, which I called Class of ‘14.  It had the numbers 1 and 4 in the design to commemorate this year’s graduating class.  But one of my readers wanted to use it for something else.  Maybe she’s making one for her brother with his favorite athlete’s number and team colors or one for a friend to celebrate her 29th birthday for the tenth time.  The point is, she needed more than a 1 and a 4.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

Because of the way I originally designed the pattern, it was easy to replace the numbers, so I sat down and mapped out everything from 0 to 9.  You can download the set here.  Be sure to print it at full scale so the numbers will match the available space on the pattern.

Each page looks like this:

Zero and One

It shows the number as it will look finished, the reversed number (how it will look while you’re working with it) and the pattern for actually sewing the numbers.  Some numbers, like the 0, can be sewn as one piece so they are simply numbered.  Others need to be sewn as two pieces, an A section and a B section, then A and B are sewn together.

The numbers can be plugged into the design in the areas shown in red below.  Keep in mind your design is reversed, so place your numbers accordingly.

Coffee Sleeve Template for numbers

You can download a PDF of this here, or visit the original tutorial and use the pattern there.

My thanks to Linda for asking for these!

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Class of ‘14

It came to my attention after I wrote this that you might be interested in using numbers other than 1 and 4, especially if you’ve found this after we’ve moved past the class of ’14.  You can find all of the numbers, 0 – 9, here which can be plugged into the design in any combination you’d like!

 

My baby is graduating from high school this spring.  I’m having a hard time wrapping my brain around that idea.  It seems like yesterday he was playing with Hot Wheels and wishing he could be Buzz Lightyear, and now we’re talking about college and career.  But whether I’m ready for it or not, it’s happening, so I’m trying to get onboard.  I’m starting with a coffee cup sleeve, commemorating his graduating class.  This one is going to his school as part of a giveaway for seniors who’ve completed their financial aid applications, but make it in their school colors and it would be a great gift for any graduate.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

This is where all that information on foundation paper piecing that I shared on Monday is going to come in handy.  If you didn’t get a chance to go over it, at the very least watch Crafty Gemini’s video before digging into this project.

As with every coffee sleeve before it, you’ll need fabric, InsulBrite, elastic cord and a button.  You’ll also need to print one copy of this pattern, which includes three pages.  The full sleeve pattern is included twice, because you’ll need two of them.  The labels on the pieces are shown in red for the parts that should be a contrasting color, represented in yellow on my project.  Be sure you print at full size.

We’re going to start by making the numbers.  Cut each of the numbers apart on the pattern.  I like to start by cutting out a larger-than-necessary piece of fabric for each piece I’ll be sewing.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2

To start, place piece A1 on the wrong side of the pattern with the wrong side of the fabric facing the paper.  You can hold it up to a light source to make sure it’s placed correctly.  Ignore the backward letters on my pattern pieces.  I was working from the rough draft when I made my sleeve.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Add the next piece, which will be A2, with right sides of the fabric facing each other and enough overlap on the sewing line for a 1/4” seam.  This is the back side of the pattern.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 4

Reduce the stitch size on your machine to around 1 1/4 – 1 1/2.  Stitch on the front of the pattern along the line, overstitching by a bit on each end.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 5

Fold the pattern back along the stitching and cut the seam allowance to 1/4”.  Some people feel like this step is optional, but it keeps everything a little neater and less confusing for me.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 6

With a dry iron, press piece A2 back.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 7

Repeat the process with pieces A3 and A4.  Cut around the piece along the outer edge of the pattern, which leaves a 1/4” seam allowance all the way around.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 8

And it should look something like this.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 9

Sew the B pieces together the same way, then attach section A to section B.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 10

Now that you have the 1 finished, complete the 4 the same way.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 11

Beginning with the 1, treat it as your first piece on the full coffee sleeve pattern.  Place it carefully and accurately.  Continue with the next pieces, which will be C and D.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 12

Add the remaining pieces through F, then add M to the end.  Set the entire piece aside.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 13

Repeat on the second paper print-out, using the 4 as your starting piece and continuing with J through L and adding N to the end.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 14

Trim the inside of both pieces leaving a 1/4” seam allowance.  Stitch the two pieces together down the center with right sides together.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 15

Flip over and cut around the outside edge of the pattern.  A seam allowance is already accounted for.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 16

Carefully tear away all of the paper.  Tweezers might come in handy for the small pieces in the seams.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 17

Cut out the backing and the InsulBrite. Cut a 3” piece of the elastic cord and sew or tie the ends of it together.  Layer the pieces with the InsulBrite, the front, the elastic centered on the right side, a tag on the left if you use one and the back face down on top.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 18

Stitch around with a 1/4” seam, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom for turning.  Clip the corners, turn right-side out and press, turning in the opening.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 19

Stitch all the way around, close to the edge.  Sew the button on the side opposite the elastic.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 20

Hook the elastic around the button, slide it onto a cup and you’re done.

Class of '14 Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 21

Are you a little dizzy after all of that?  I know it seems complex, but once you understand the basics of foundation paper piecing it’s actually pretty easy.  I look at it like this – at least it’s not as difficult and complicated as graduating from high school!

Foundation Paper Piecing Basics

If you’re a quilter, you are probably familiar with foundation paper piecing.  If not, you’ve likely seen the technique used, you just didn’t know how it was done.  It makes the most intimidating designs with tiny pieces manageable.  Basically, foundation paper piecing is sewing fabric onto a paper pattern in a specific order to create a picture or design.  This wall hanging from Quiltmaker is a good example (all of the blocks can be downloaded on their site).

Seasons and Celebrations from Quiltmaker

For me, paper piecing is like driving a stick shift.  I know how to do it, but so much time passes in between that I have to refresh my memory every time before I get started.  If you’ve never tried paper piecing, or need a reminder like me, this video from Crafty Gemini is one of the best I’ve seen.  It’s simple, but all of the important points are there.  There is also a good video from Connecting Threads.  If you’d rather read that watch, check out the aptly named series from The Littlest Thistle – Foundation Paper Piecing for the Terrified

Foundation Paper Piecing for the Terrified from The Littest Thistle

The reason I’m bringing up foundation paper piecing today is that I’ll be sharing a project on Wednesday that uses the technique.  I’ve give you a hint…it’s Coffee Sleeve of the Month time again!

I wanted to try out a small project before I tackled my coffee sleeve, so I decided to make a Confetti Star Block from During Quiet Time on Craftsy.  It’s piecing in sections, then the sections are joined, which is similar to my pattern.  I’ll tell you right now, some people are really good at cutting their pieces with a minimum amount of waste, but I am not those people.  My pieces are big and sloppy.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 1

I followed the directions that came with the pattern, which involved building each of the four sections.  One thing I re-learned on my first row of stitching is that you have to make sure each piece is going to cover it’s intended area, which may involve some planning, such as turning this one so it would be oriented correctly when it’s flipped back.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 2

I assembled each section, which gave me this.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 3

I left the paper attached to sew the sections together, but I think I would remove it next time.  It was a little tricky getting some of it out of the seams.  Also, when the instructions tell you to shorten your stitch length, don’t forget to do it.  It makes removing the paper MUCH easier.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 4

After I removed all of the paper and gave it a good, final press, I was pretty happy with the result.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 5

A closer view reveals that some of my corners didn’t match up perfectly, but I still think it’s cute enough to use somewhere.

Foundation Paper Piecing - Crafty Staci 6

Are you ready to try a foundation paper pieced coffee cup sleeve?  Great…I’ll see you on Wednesday!

Skirt Save

The police department my husband works for holds an awards ceremony every year.  It’s always nice to see the officers and citizens recognized for their hard work and bravery, and it’s a good chance for our law enforcement family to catch up with each other.  Tonight’s the night, so I decided to make a skirt to wear that I’d bought the ingredients for last week. 

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 1

I have a few comments about this pattern.  First of all, I never pay more than about $2.50 for a clothing pattern.  There’s already too much risk involved for me without paying $15 to $18.  This one was $1.  Second, I like the different style options available on this one.  Last, but not least, this is only a 2 hour pattern if you are paying attention and not trying to do several other things at the same time.  The rest of this story can only be blamed on me, not Simplicity.

Cutting this out was a breeze, as it only uses three pattern pieces.  The first step is just stitching the two from pieces together, then the sides.  Piece of cake.  Had I just stuck with one thing at a time, instead of bouncing between this project and another, everything would still be fine.  You can probably imagine by now, that’s not how this went.  This is what the waistband should look like once it’s sewn on.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 2

After stitching the original seam, stitching a second seam next to it for added strength and zigzag stitching over the edge to make sure my unravel-prone fabric would stay together, I held the skirt up and found this.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 3

That, my friends, is the outside of the skirt.  With the exposed seam for the waistband.  I just sat there staring at it in disbelief.  A lifetime of sewing, and I was going to lose this skirt to a dumb mistake.  There was no way this fabric was going to survive ripping out three seams and still be viable.  I thought about cutting off the waistband and starting over, since I had a little bit of fabric left to cut a new one, but that would mess with the shape and length of the skirt. 

Instead of throwing a fit, like I wanted to, I laid it down gently on my work table and walked away for a few minutes.  That moment of clarity was enough for me to realize all I needed to do was cover up that seam.  Bias tape to the rescue!

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 4

This tape, folded, is about 3/4” wide.  I ironed the seam down toward the bottom, then pinned the end of the tape on, barely covering the seam at the top to prevent shrinking the casing for the elastic.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 5

For the rest of the tape, I just laid it in place as I sewed close to the top edge.  When I reached the end, I cut the tape, folded the end under and stitched it over the top of where I had started.  I sewed close to the bottom edge to finish it off.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 6

After that crisis was defused, I closely followed the directions to add the elastic and hem the bottom.  Once I was finished, I tried it on and was happily surprised.  I love the black trim at the top and would actually add it on purpose if I had it to do over again.

Skirt Save - Crafty Staci 7

What did I learn from this?  It’s especially important when working on a project outside my norm, like clothing, that I pay attention to what I’m doing and not try to multitask.  Also, don’t throw away a project just because I made a mistake.  I can guarantee I’ll get to put that life lesson to use again someday.

Coffee Sleeve of the Month–Rainbow

Months ago, I had the idea to make this month’s coffee sleeve as a rainbow, due to the proximity to St. Patrick’s Day.  It seemed perfect, because the arched shape of the sleeve would lend itself perfectly to a rainbow.  I even thought it would be an easy one.  Well, things didn’t exactly go to plan, but I ended up somewhere pretty good anyway.

Really, the only thing wrong with my original pattern was the lack of good math on my part.  After I sewed it together, I realized my error and (angrily) threw it in the garbage.  I could have redrawn it, adjusting to fix my mistake, but about that same time I realized it could be saved as something different.  Instead of torturing myself by trying to do it again, I changed direction and made the coffee sleeve this way instead.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 1

To make this sleeve, you’ll need 11 pieces of fabric, cut 4 1/2 by 1 1/2”, a 3” piece of elastic cord, fabric for the backing and InsulBrite for the inside.  You’ll also need a button and this basic coffee sleeve pattern.  If you count, you’ll see that I cut 12 of the strips, but it was a full strip too long.  Another mathtastrophe.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 2

Sew the pieces together with a 1/4” seam.  Press all the seams in one direction on the back.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 3

Turn the fabric right side up and cut out the coffee sleeve.  If you’re not into rainbows, but would like to combine some different fabrics for a coffee sleeve, this technique works beautifully.  It’s great for using up scraps.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 4

Flip the pattern over and cut a backing piece and InsulBrite.  Sew or tie the ends of the elastic together.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 5

Layer the pieces with the rainbow right side up, the loop centered on the right, the back right side down and the InsulBrite.  Stitch around with 1/4”, leaving a couple of inches open at the bottom.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 6

Turn the sleeve right side out through the opening.  Press and topstitch all the way around near the edge.  Sew the button on where the elastic reaches.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci 7

If you want to up the St. Patrick’s Day-ness a bit, you could make one of these Shamrock Barrettes and sew or clip it onto the sleeve.

Shamrock barrette 9

So, what happened to Plan A?  It turned out way too wide for a coffee sleeve, but after I got ahold of myself and pulled it back out of the trash, I realized it was the perfect size and shape for a matching mug mat!

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 1

To make the mug mat, you’ll need rainbow strips cut from this pattern, fabric for the backing and batting for the inside (you can use InsulBrite here if you’d like).

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 2

Sew the pieces together.  Since you’re matching an outward curve to an inward curve, I found it was best to just match the edges up as I sewed instead of trying to pin everything in place first.  For some reason I ended up a little short on the yellow row, but I just cut the entire edge to match.

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 3

Using this piece as a pattern, cut the backing and batting. 

Rainbow Mug Mat - Crafty Staci 4

Layer the pieces just like the coffee sleeve, omitting the elastic.  Sew together with a 1/4” seam, leaving an opening for turning.  Turn right side out, press and topstitch near the edge.

Rainbow Coffee Sleeve and Mug Mat - Crafty Staci

How’s that for snatching victory from the jaws of defeat?

Rainbow Mug Mat and Coffee Sleeve - Crafty Staci

On an unrelated note, this is the final day for my 4th Anniversary Giveaway winner to contact me, or I will have to draw a new name.  If you’re “maggiethecoder,” I’ve sent a few emails and you have until the end of today to get in touch with me so I can ship your prize!

Feather Your Nest

I live in a great area.  West of us is a town called Gresham, where I can usually find just about anything I need.  The one thing it was lacking was an independent quilt and fabric shop.  There are places to buy fabric, but there’s just something about those cute shops that is special.  My daughter informed me last week that the void has been filled. 

Feather Your Nest opened last fall, but somehow I missed it.  Codi found it because it’s across the street from the cupcake shop that’s making the cupcakes for the wedding and has gluten-free options on Wednesdays.  She’s a regular. 

They’re located on Main Avenue.  The building has great tall ceilings and lots of windows.  It’s a very creatively inspiring space.  I promise you I looked at every single bolt of fabric they had before deciding on these three.

Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 1

They don’t go together, but individually I love each one.  The top one is a print from Sweetwater made up of street addresses.  I’ve been wanting to get a piece of it because MY address is there too!  My husband actually found it, so I’ve got to find a project where it will show. 

I’ve been noticing nautical stuff everywhere, which I’ve always liked anyway, so I had to have the anchor print.  In person, it’s a really pretty shade of blue.  The bottom is because words.  Words are always fun.

Why am I telling you about a fabric shop that you aren’t likely to visit unless you happen to be in my area?  Because they also have an Etsy shop, and it seems to have most of the same prints I found in their shop, including the three above.  You can find them as FeatheredNest97030.  I spoke to the mother and daughter owners when I was there and they couldn’t have been nicer. 

Here’s a few of their prints that are on my wish list:

Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 2     Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 5     Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 4     Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 6Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 7Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 3     Feather Your Nest Fabric Shop - Crafty Staci 8

After I left Feather Your Nest, I also visited the cupcake shop, a local candy store and a doughnut shop for gifts for my family for Valentine’s day.  Have you found any hidden gems where you live?  If you can’t find any where you are, come visit us in Gresham!

Easy Lined Zippered Bag

As I promised on my 4th Anniversary Giveaway post from Monday, I’m here today to show you how to make these lined, zippered bags.  Crazy easy.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 1

These are so simple, in fact, I actually had to look back through my projects to make sure I hadn’t already covered them.  I can’t believe I haven’t, but let’s fix that, shall we?

To make one, all you need is fabric and a zipper.  For a typical purse size, your zipper should be in the 7 – 9” range.  Cut your fabric into rectangles the width of the zipper (or slightly smaller) and the height you’d like your bag, plus 1/2”.  My zipper was just over 8” from end to end, so I cut my fabric 8” by 6 1/2”.  You’ll need two pieces for the outside and two pieces for the lining.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 2

Lay one of the lining pieces right side up.  Line up the edge of the zipper with the edge of the fabric with the zipper also right side up.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 3

Add one of the outside pieces on top with the right size down.  Using a zipper foot on your sewing machine, stitch 1/4” from the edge.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 4

I don’t know about you, but even with a zipper foot I always end up with wonky stitching when I pass the zipper pull.  To avoid that, unzip the zipper a few inches before you begin stitching.  Just before you’re about to stitch past the pull, make sure your needle is fully down in the fabric and lift the presser foot.  Zip the zipper back up past your needle.  Lower the presser foot again and continue stitching.  Nice, straight seam!

Press both fabrics away from zipper.  Topstitch close to the fold.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 5

Repeat steps with the remaining outside and lining pieces on the other side of the zipper.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 6

Unzip the zipper halfway.  This step is important, because if you forget you won’t be able to turn your bag right side out.  Open out both sides.  Pin the two outside pieces to each other with right sides together, same with the lining.  The zipper should fold with the teeth facing the lining side.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 7

Stitch all the way around 1/4” from the edge, leaving 3” open at the bottom of the lining.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 8

Clip the corners.  Turn the entire bag right side out through the opening.  Push out the corners.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 9

Press the bottom seam of the lining, turning in the opening.  Stitch across the bottom close to the edge.  You could also hand stitch the opening closed if you prefer.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 10

Push the lining into the bag, iron out the wrinkles and you’re done.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 11

If you want to get a little fancier, you can make your bag so it will stand up.  You can also add a loop if you’d like to clip it to a bigger bag or use it as a wristlet.

Cut all your pieces the same, except add 1” to the height on all pieces.  Cut two pieces of iron-on interfacing the same size.  For the loop, cut fabric and interfacing 2 by 4 1/2”.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 12

Apply the interfacing to the outside pieces and the back of the loop piece.  Fold the loop in half with wrong sides together and press.  Fold both edges in to meet the middle.  Press.  Stitch close to both folds.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 13

Continue making the bag and shown above.  When you reach the point where you’re pinning the outsides and lining together, fold the loop in half and slip into the seam allowance of the outer pieces, about 1” down from the zipper.  Double stitch over the loop for added security.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 14

Once you’ve sewn the seam all the way around, stop before turning it right side out.  Flatten the corners so the seams touch and pin.  Stitch across each corner 1 1/4” from the point.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 15

Cut off the excess from each corner.  Turn right side out and finish as shown above.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 16

These are great for so many uses, take very few supplies and are quick to whip up.

Easy Lined Zippered Bag - Crafty Staci 17

Be sure to visit THIS POST before midnight on Saturday, February 15, 2014 to enter to win my anniversary giveaway, which includes one of these little bags!